Recommendations on a small travel camera?

moucheur2003

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Beautiful images Sir,but the #1 criteria for a salt water camera is that it must be waterproof and reasonably drop proof.
I don't think there's a waterproof camera that can do everything Todd asked. As I said, my Sony takes great shots, is very small, has a huge zoom range, and has lots of controls, but it's not waterproof. (As I look back over Todd's requirements, I also see that it doesn't shoot RAW. I have a Lumix ZS80 that even more features than my Sony, such as shooting RAW and focus stacking, but it's a little bigger and I don't think the image quality is quite as good.) According to reviews the best waterproof and dropproof camera on the market at the moment seems to be the Olympus TG-6 (mine is the now-discontinued Nikon AW120; Nikon's current model is the W300), but Todd specifically said that he wants more zoom than the TG-6 or other waterproof cameras can provide. When I'm on a fishing trip and want to take pictures I usually bring both my Sony and my Nikon. They are small enough that having both of them stuffed in my pockets or pack isn't a burden.
 
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moucheur2003

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I also learned that Olympus has sold off it's camera division. I'm not sure what this will do to their new cameras moving forward. I don't think it would stop me from considering the TG6 though.
For full-featured cameras, I switched from Nikon DSLRs to Olympus micro 4/3 mirrorless a few years ago because they are so much lighter and smaller. (And I love the retro 35mm SLR look.) There has been a lot of buzz on Olympus forums about Olympus exiting the camera business, as you might imagine. The reality is that smartphones have taken such a big bite out of the casual photography market that every one of the established camera brands is losing money right now, not just Olympus. Watch for more upheaval in the industry in the future. However, I take some comfort in the assurances that the new Olympus owners have been giving. They say they intend to invest more in the business and are hinting at innovative new products on the drawing boards. Even if you buy a TG-6 and then the company craters, you'll still have a handy little waterproof pocket camera until you no longer need it, at which point you wouldn't necessarily have chosen Olympus for your next one anyway.
 

ts47

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For full-featured cameras, I switched from Nikon DSLRs to Olympus micro 4/3 mirrorless a few years ago because they are so much lighter and smaller. (And I love the retro 35mm SLR look.) There has been a lot of buzz on Olympus forums about Olympus exiting the camera business, as you might imagine. The reality is that smartphones have taken such a big bite out of the casual photography market that every one of the established camera brands is losing money right now, not just Olympus. Watch for more upheaval in the industry in the future. However, I take some comfort in the assurances that the new Olympus owners have been giving. They say they intend to invest more in the business and are hinting at innovative new products on the drawing boards. Even if you buy a TG-6 and then the company craters, you'll still have a handy little waterproof pocket camera until you no longer need it, at which point you wouldn't necessarily have chosen Olympus for your next one anyway.
Agreed! Smartphones have replaced much of the stand alone camera market. And... With as long as cameras last these day, the upgrade cycle will normally get to you before the camera wears out.

Now if only Nikon could get their act together. I would love to upgrade to a high end DX size mirrorless that works with all my old Nikon lenses before the upgrade cycle pushes me in a different direction... I need a DSLR for work. It also makes a good excuse to use it for fun as well.

Your comments in the post above are accurate as well. The TG-6 doesn’t do everything I would like it to. For the rest, I’ll have to rely on my DSLR (Or hopefully a mirrorless upgrade).
 
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dynaflow

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Despite their quality images,Iphones and the like don't figure in the rough 'n tumble world of salt water fly fishing IMHO....at least until they are more robust.As for Macro image,why the necessity? Surely the quality images from the likes of the TG-6 are ample?
 

iv_wjb

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Now if only Nikon could get their act together. I would love to upgrade to a high end DX size mirrorless that works with all my old Nikon lenses before the upgrade cycle pushes me in a different direction... I need a DSLR for work. It also makes a good excuse to use it for fun as well.
I believe Nikon does make a couple of options for a compact, mirrorless cameras which are useable with our old lenses (via an adapter). I use a Nikon V1 for work, and it’s a great camera. I believe it’s no longer produced but, they make a more capable and spiffy range of models in this vein, now. I forget what they are called but, I played with them in the shop the other day, and they are pretty nice!! The F-mount adapter is only a couple of hundred bucks... I had to leave the shop before I came home with another camera that I definitely did not need!!
 
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moucheur2003

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Your comments in the post above are accurate as well. The TG-6 doesn’t do everything I would like it to. For the rest, I’ll have to rely on my DSLR (Or hopefully a mirrorless upgrade).
DSLRs are great if bulk and weight aren't impediments. But if they are, consider one of the feature-rich, pocket-size superzooms like the Nikon AW80 or the Lumix ZS80. You might be surprised at their capability.
 

ts47

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I believe Nikon does make a couple of options for a compact, mirrorless cameras which are useable with our old lenses (via an adapter). I use a Nikon V1 for work, and it’s a great camera. I believe it’s no longer produced but, they make a more capable and spiffy range of models in this vein, now. I forget what they are called but, I played with them in the shop the other day, and they are pretty nice!! The F-mount adapter is only a couple of hundred bucks... I had to leave the shop before I came home with another camera that I definitely did not need!!
Nikon has two lines of mirrorless DSLR cameras. The first is the DX line with an APS-C size sensor. This is the size sensor I need and use for work. They only offer one model in this line currently - the Z50. It would be much smaller and lighter than my current camera, but a lateral move in terms of its capabilities. In their much more expensive full frame cameras, they currently have 3 models with a 4th on it's way. I don't currently have the need to spend "full frame" money though.

If Nikon expands its DX line with a model above the Z50, a Z70 for example, it would be a nice upgrade and work with the many (F mount) lenses I already own via that adapter you mentioned. I could also switch to their new DX "Z" lenses as they come available. Doing this would also fulfill the wish list I posted at the start of this thread. The nice thing about mirrorless DSLR cameras is the camera itself and the lenses designed to work with them are all much smaller and lighter than traditional style DSLR equipment. My plan is to go mirrorless once a suitable camera is available from Nikon. If not, I'll likely switch systems and go with Sony or Canon. This negates my need for a superzoom camera - and is why I opted for the TG-6. Not to mention, owning a waterproof camera that can go fishing with me, would just be a lot of fun!! ...as you already know. :cool:

If you are not into or don't need interchangeable lenses like I do, the superzoom cameras like moucheur2003 mentioned, and a few from Cannon and Sony are all very capable, have a considerable zoom range, can take beautiful photos and are small enough to be easily packable! They are also much less expensive than what I'll be doing and can be great choices for a large number of photographers. (y)

And moucheur2003, if you read this, those are some great photos! You’ve got a good eye for composition!
 
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rsagebrush

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I still use my Nikon V1, it is a great camera and I'm sorry that Nikon dropped it. It takes lovely photos and has never let me down. I have a V2 as a backup. It's small and has interchangeable lenses, people complain about the sensor size and megapixel, and it's hard to get good bokeh with most of the lenses, big whoop. As an upside I don't think anyone would want to steal it either. They did make a waterproof version too.
 

myt1

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I have a TG-4. It has been a great camera for me, but I'm a snap-shot guy.

I didn't realize until I read some of the above posts that it doesn't zoom in as close as some of the other cameras. It would be nice if it zoomed in more, but that isn't the main reason I got it.

It is virtually indestructible and transferring the photos to my phone via the wi-fi feature is seamless (once you figure it out). This is important to me because I don't like to bring my phone to the river. One lost phone to the bottom of a river was enough.

Also, I am amazed how long the battery lasts before needing charging. It can easily go a week, if not significantly longer.

Wow, I didn't realize how scratched the viewing screen was until I took the photo.IMG_1942.JPGIMG_1943.JPG
 

SerialNumber

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I've been looking at those Olympus Tough cameras since perusing this thread. I'm not sure if a point-and-shoot is for me on the river. I have an older, non-waterproof number in my pack for next time out to see if I like the setup. It's more about the logistics of taking shots than anything else. If I find it doesn't work I might go back to not taking pictures. But as I get older I find I want to share these moments with my family more than in the past. And I do enjoy some of the GoPro fishing videos that are out there.
One lost phone to the bottom of a river was enough.
This reminds me of something that happened to me last summer, on a sunny day in a creek in the Sierra. My string of thoughts went like this:

"Oh! Something flashed in the water there -- a fish maybe? Wait, there it is again... No, it's not moving. Not a fish. Let's see... Oh my gosh, it's a phone! Wow. Wait, that's MY phone!" :)

It had been there probably 15 minutes. Amazingly it continued to work another couple months until my wife knocked it off the counter at home.
 

Bam Boozelled

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When I walk my creek and want some nice pictures I bring my Fujifilm X100S. Its small enough to fit in my chest pack, has a little zoom, all the adjustability that you get in a DSLR, and it's not too heavy. Downsides are It's definitely not designed to be dropped or beat up, and it has a fixed lens. I did drop mine straight into a run where by the grace of god I reach down and grabbed it before it was swept away. Immediately took the card and battery out, tossed it in a bag of rice for a week and it was fine.

Couple pictures I've taken with mine. (Post drop)






 
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