Rivers Full of Carp

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Liphookedau

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Talking about Carp most of our Outback Rivers & some of The Bigger Lakes over here are full of them they were brought over here & put in The Irrigation Canals & have since migrated everywhere.
Even though many people eat them they are also harvested to make fertilizer.
Brian
 

Unknownflyman

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Here some lakes have rivers feeding into them and fish traps, they harvest many tons of carp and make fertilizer and many tons are sold to restaurants as "whitefish" It`s about half and half on the harvest every year

You might have eaten a carp sandwich and never knew it at a fast food chain.
 

wolfglen

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I don't know about the European carp, but here in Florida they have stocked the Asian grass carp which grows to over 4' in length.

In places where they have installed fish feeders to help offset some of the rather sterile pits and have grass carp in them the carp congregate around the feeders at feeding time and wolf down the pellets. When they do this they will readily take a #10 or 12 brown beetle fly. They really don't fight a lot for their bulk, one run to about the end of your fly line, one to half of it and then just a lot of dodging five feet away at the end.

If there are a lot of tilapia around they also become accustomed to the pellets and are dry fly wonders. Up to 12 lbs.
'
However, in some places there are pacu. I used to have them in my ponds and they also readily took a dry fly. I had them up to 30 lbs, but in one of the cold spells they all died.

Jack
 

wf10f

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... They really don't fight a lot for their bulk, one run to about the end of your fly line, one to half of it and then just a lot of dodging five feet away at the end.

If there are a lot of tilapia around they also become accustomed to the pellets and are dry fly wonders. Up to 12 lbs.

Jack
Funny but that fight you're talking about sounds a lot like a bonefish. One major run, one minor run, then a few back and forths. Maybe the comparison to bonefish is more apt than I thought.

And if those tilapia are the same I've bought at Sam's Club I'd love to catch some of those and put 'em in the pan.
 

wanderingsalmon

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I thought people didn't eat carp... You can?
When I was a kid I had a "Godmother" who escaped Czechoslovakia before the iron curtain fell. Her family for the holidays would buy a big live carp and keep it in the bathtub for a few days to clean it out, and that was Christmas dinner. I ended up taking her much younger sister, who the Soviet authorities had allowed to travel to the US (but made her leave her daughter behind to make sure she didn't defect) to a Grateful Dead show back in '82... but that's a whole different story.
 

geordie41

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Very popular to eat in Eastern Europe,in the UK it’s quite the problem with many fish being taken illegally for the table by the Eastern European.
Over here in Australia the European Carp are a pest classed as vermin they are used for fertiliser. It’s illegal to return them to the water,once caught they have to be dispatched.
 

ddb

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Dear old Dad's recipe for pegged smoked carp--

Take a slab of cedar mount it angled over a fire pit with burned down coals. Attach the carp -- previously brined overnight -- with small nails angled over the coals. Spread water-soaked apple wood chips on the coals and let the fish smoke for 3 hours.

Throw way the carp and eat the board.

ddb
 

Lewis Chessman

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Carp was a staple food through most of Europe until the advent of Protestantism which removed the necessity to eat fish on Fridays, or rather, too not eat meat - which a Papal edict demanded of Roman Catholics. Most UK monasteries and abbeys would have carp ponds (I'm sure true for the Continent, too) in which the fish were farmed to ensure a steady supply.
The tradition of eating carp (and other coarse fish) survives today in many R.C. European countries, particularly in the East. To them, the idea of catching and not killing a big carp was something of an anathema when they arrived in 'catch and release UK' and it led to some confrontations in the past. I'm well removed from the coarse fishing world where I live now but haven't heard of the problem for a long time. Hopefully the cultural misunderstanding is less common now.

I've seen but not eaten carp (at the Czech club in London). It was white, flaky and not oily. The flesh looked firm, not watery as some freshwater fish can be.
If the carp has been bottom-feeding then it may taste muddy, hence the practice of 'cleaning' them in a tub (or bath! :) ) to improve the taste.
I've no idea how good these invasive carp you have taste but, personally, I'd want rid. Were the people who introduced them, even if accidentally, ever prosecuted?


On a fishing note, these medieval ecclesiastical carp (and trout) ponds had a curious by-product .... the promotion of 'Anglyng' and fishing literature. In the Middle Ages clergymen were forbidden to draw blood. Bishops could go into battle with a war club or hammer and break bones ..... but not with a sword or spear. In peacetime the nobility hunted - but high ranking clerics were forbidden to join in - no bloodshed allowed. So, having fishing on their doorstep, they took up angling as a country sport and made it a fitting activity for the gentry rather than the common man. Being literate, they then wrote about their sport, further encouraging the wealthier, also-literate classes, those with time for leisure, to pick up a rod. Such were the origins of fishing as a sport, as opposed to for the plate, in the UK at least.
It's no coincidence, I believe, that the earliest know fly dressing text was found in the 'Haslinger Breviary' (1452) which belonged to an Austrian priest and that the earliest text in English (A Treatyse of Fysshynge wyth an Angle' (1496) was by Dame Juliana Berners, a prioress from an aristocratic family.

All this followed because a Pope wanted his flock to exercise a little self-denial on a Friday. :)
 

ddb

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And the Pope was playing to European maritime countries where most commercial fishing was located. Were there 'back-handers' then too?

ddb
 

karstopo

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In the last century on the little lake I live on, gill netters would set nets from shore to shore and get big Buffalo carp. I asked my dad what they did with the fish. He said the fish went to St. Louis, Missouri and were processed into Gefilte fish. I don’t know if that is the truth or not, but every time I see a jar of the Gefilte fish at Passover I think of those big Buffalo carp and the men that came and caught them.
 

Rip Tide

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Back when I was a kid, we used to chase big carp that got trapped in river-side farm field depressions after the spring flood receded.
Bows and arrows. Baseball bats studded with nails
Then we'd sell the fish to the guys driving garbage trucks to the dump.
Enough cash for a birch beer and a Crunch Bar.
Good times
 

brownbass

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I think it was last year that St. Louis County Parks had commercial fisherman clean out Creve Coeur Lake, Missouri's largest natural lake of Silver Carp. It is an ancient ox-bow, over 200 acres, that gets flooded by the Missouri River when it floods the bottoms. They dreg the lake from time to time and people sail and row the lake. The carp got as bad as they can get and were jumping and slamming the rowing teams and sailors. I believe they turned those fish into fertilizer.

Bill
 

MicahLeeLeslie

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Lets start an invasive species cat food company. All fly fishing forum members pitch in a few hundred dollars and dedicate a week out of the year to catch.
 

ikankecil

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Fish preference (for food) is entirely regional. Commercial fishermen in NC catch AJ's off the wrecks and send it to Louisiana because nobody in NC will eat them due to 'worms' (which all fish have anyway). Raw tuna?! -good luck finding any local in eastern NC to eat that, but they will happily sell it to Japan for a fortune.

When I was in Seychelles I enjoyed watching the morning fish markets and seeing what fish were most sought after. One morning I got there early and there were wahoo, yellowfin tuna, barracuda, trevally (jacks), dolphin,17# bonefish, etc. I knew that back home the wahoo and YFT would likely sell first. I went back at 3pm, most every fish had been sold except those yellowfin tuna and dolphin (mahi). The hot sellers were the barracuda and the trevally. Jacks and cuda wouldn't be hot sellers in the west if the other fish were also available but those were what the locals bought up with a quickness.

Tastes are regional.
 

goofnoff1

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They are over harvesting menhaden in Cheapeake Bay which is damaging game fish populations. The big dollars for menhaen is the Omega3 industry but they are also sold for cattle feed supplement and linoleum. I'm sure the carp could be used or cattle feed. I don't think they are oily enough for linoleum. They would also make great fertilizer,
 
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