Riverstick Custom-machined Wading Staffs

Acheron

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The stick is great. Works really well, I was out last weekend walking across a lot of moss covered rocks with a lot more confidence and no slipping and sliding around. I hated how difficult the others were to deploy/breakdown and this Riverstick does not have those issues.

It's stout! As an aside, with the swing weight of a baseball bat it can quickly be deployed and used as a weapon to fend off bears and moutain lions. ;) :D

Fits right onto the belt loop of my backpack (and my waistpack as well)
 
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mike126

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I currently have the Folstaf. I don’t find it that hard to break down but fewer sections would be better. I do have an issue with it tapping against rocks when I have it deployed and tethered to my belt. I have added a rubber chair cap with a small hole to allow the very tip of the tungsten tip to protrude as well as slipped a bike inner tube over the last section.

For the Riverstick does it sink or is it neutrally buoyant? Does it tap rocks as it floats?

Also without a full pouch will it pop out and deploy?


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herkileez

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I currently have the Folstaf. I don’t find it that hard to break down but fewer sections would be better. I do have an issue with it tapping against rocks when I have it deployed and tethered to my belt. I have added a rubber chair cap with a small hole to allow the very tip of the tungsten tip to protrude as well as slipped a bike inner tube over the last section.
For the Riverstick does it sink or is it neutrally buoyant? Does it tap rocks as it floats? Also without a full pouch will it pop out and deploy?
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I use a retractor to keep the grip at my hip when deployed. With the rubber tip, I don't find it taps noticeably. The (approx) 1/8" walled aluminum tubing allows the staff to sink, again, with the grip at my hip. I find this less troublesome than having a staff that free floats in the current. My logic in using the hammer loop is that hammers have been carried this way, unchanged, for, likely, over 100 years. This makes one-hand deployment and replacement very easy. For this reason, you will never see a hammer carried in a pouch....For much of the design, I used existing and proven components. I have never had my staff deploy from the holster on its own.
 

duker

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I've been in the market for a wading staff for a few years now. I'm a clumsy guy at the best of times, and getting older isn't helping that. Last year I made myself a wading staff out of an metal broom handle plus a rubber crutch tip and bike handle grip. Took it on my steelhead trip last year and liked it--well, I liked having a wading staff but not my home made one. For one thing, it was a bit bendy if I put a lot of weight on it. I'm not a heavy guy by any stretch, and I did not like using a bendy staff. For another thing, a 60" wading staff is not the most convenient thing to store or carry around when you're not using it. Also, it was fairly light--didn't really have a pleasing heft--and floated in the river while I was fishing, which was a pain.

Though the price of my home made one was right, I started looking at collapsible wading staffs. A number of my buddies use various models of those telescoping aluminum ski/hiking poles, but most aren't long enough for a tall guy like me, plus the joints always get jamned with sand and grit and then they're useless. The Simms seems to have the potential to suffer from those same issues, and is spendy. I like the Folstaf but they're also kind of spendy.

So. After reading the reviews here and on speypages, I just took delivery of one of Rick's staffs last week. I haven't had it out fishing yet, but have walked the dog and around the neighbourhood with it. This is by far the most impressive staff currently on the market, and in my opinion the best value for your money. Incredibly well made and sturdy. Fewer sections than the Simms or Folstaf. Some nice little touches--the wrist strap and stainless steel carabiner/lanyard ring are genius--and I like that it's field repairable. Rick even threw in a spare tip. Some have noted that it's heavy, and it is heavier than a Folstaf or Simms, but I don't find it uncomfortably so. I like the heft, and the way it swings when I walk. And as Acheron pointed out, you could easily fight something or someone off with this staff. Finally, it's made in Canada, and locally--Rick lives just up the big island from me.

Tl;dr--if you're looking for a collapsible wading staff just buy this one. You won't regret it.
 

markmark444

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I've been in the market for a wading staff for a few years now. I'm a clumsy guy at the best of times, and getting older isn't helping that. Last year I made myself a wading staff out of an metal broom handle plus a rubber crutch tip and bike handle grip. Took it on my steelhead trip last year and liked it--well, I liked having a wading staff but not my home made one. For one thing, it was a bit bendy if I put a lot of weight on it. I'm not a heavy guy by any stretch, and I did not like using a bendy staff. For another thing, a 60" wading staff is not the most convenient thing to store or carry around when you're not using it. Also, it was fairly light--didn't really have a pleasing heft--and floated in the river while I was fishing, which was a pain.

Though the price of my home made one was right, I started looking at collapsible wading staffs. A number of my buddies use various models of those telescoping aluminum ski/hiking poles, but most aren't long enough for a tall guy like me, plus the joints always get jamned with sand and grit and then they're useless. The Simms seems to have the potential to suffer from those same issues, and is spendy. I like the Folstaf but they're also kind of spendy.

So. After reading the reviews here and on speypages, I just took delivery of one of Rick's staffs last week. I haven't had it out fishing yet, but have walked the dog and around the neighbourhood with it. This is by far the most impressive staff currently on the market, and in my opinion the best value for your money. Incredibly well made and sturdy. Fewer sections than the Simms or Folstaf. Some nice little touches--the wrist strap and stainless steel carabiner/lanyard ring are genius--and I like that it's field repairable. Rick even threw in a spare tip. Some have noted that it's heavy, and it is heavier than a Folstaf or Simms, but I don't find it uncomfortably so. I like the heft, and the way it swings when I walk. And as Acheron pointed out, you could easily fight something or someone off with this staff. Finally, it's made in Canada, and locally--Rick lives just up the big island from me.

Tl;dr--if you're looking for a collapsible wading staff just buy this one. You won't regret it.
I recently received this staff. I have used it and it is great and am very happy with. It is heavier than my old Dan Bailey Folstaff but steadier and I like that it doesn't float. Rick was a treat to deal with. One note of caution - you won't want to fall on it either in front of you or behind you. You will break before it does.
 

Koonman70

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Common complaints with most folding wading staffs are that they get stuck, vibrate in the current, or wear out…Not this one. Having sold over 400 of my Riverstick wading staffs worldwide, customers often comment that it has proven to be the worlds’ strongest and most practical folding wading staff on the market.
The heart of the staff is the extremely durable, heavy-guage 6061 marine-grade aluminum tubing and machined inserts. A unique practical feature of the staff is that all other components: the grip, rubber tips and bungee cord are easily found in most hardware stores, This allows the staff to be totally self-maintainable, and virtually able to withstand a lifetime of use. The hammer loop holster has proven to be the perfect holster, allowing the staff to be easily deployed, or replaced, with one hand.
The staff comes with a nylon wrist strap and stainless ring just below the grip for clipping onto a retractor to let it hang extended. At 1 lb 10 ozs, it is solid, and built to last.

I build each staff to your preferred length, or can recommend a length to suit your height.
Rule of thumb for height/length: 5’5” - 5’7” = 51”, 5'8" - 5'10" = 52", 5'11" - 6' 2" = 53", 6'3" - 6'5"= 54-56". A good measure is to top of waders with boots on.

Price is $100 + $20 (shipping in NA) = $120 usd total.
Please pm for further information.

View attachment 30045View attachment 30046View attachment 31291
Does the staff lock together once extended? Meaning, lock similar to the Simms and Orvis or will it pull apart like the Foldstaff?
 
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