Sage LL

mike_r

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Seems like the guys at Telluride Angler really liked the 490. That is the rod I would consider for myself; since I no longer have one in the quiver as my 486 B3 LS has seen a good bit of action lately and is the long 4wt for me now.


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ibookje

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Got the original 490-4 LL. Curious how it compares. The LL is still an amazing rod despite its age
 

sweetandsalt

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I have read a few reviews now but they have not informed me. I'm trying to get my hands on a test sample but Sage is far behind in production as demand for them far outstrips their ability to build them. The 9'/#4 and 6 intrigue me as do the pair of 8 1/2' models.
 

FlymanSJB

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A little too new, I thought so, I did get a very favorable PM on the LL from an early adopter. Looks like this one could have us all lining up. Pun intended.
 

rsagebrush

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Seems like their last Medium action rod, the Circa-'Where Slow meets something', but with the Special HD high performance paint job. I see it's also vastly improved on the original version, of course, or what would be the use of spending another $800.00, which actually seems to be a fair price considering.

It will probably be a hot seller.
 

ibookje

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The finish does look a step down in quality. The cork has tons of fillings, the hardware looks like cheap OEM from Far East.
 

sweetandsalt

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The finish does look a step down in quality. The cork has tons of fillings, the hardware looks like cheap OEM from Far East.
I'm far lower on the totem pole than the big marketer/sellers like the folks at Telluride Anglers and even they can't get an 8 1/2'/#4 T LL. I've been e-mailed it is perhaps a month away...they are working on it but nobody is home; all the Farbank brass are out in Montana for "meetings". Putting this model next to my new GS 8'4"/#4 will be interesting to say the least. Personally, I never got into the MOD and my pards 8'9"/#4 Circa does not do much for me (or him either). I do have an 8'8"/#4 Upstream which is a nice deeper flexer but it sees little water time. My sense is that new T LL is deeper but also progressive with more lower reserves and vastly enhanced recovery rates...this could be the smaller water winner, we shall see.

Aesthetics. Well they are, as it is said, in the eyes of the beholder. I like the blunt Wells grip on my current Sage ONEs and X and find the cork quality to be better than average if not as good as, say, T&T. Sage has designed the new T LL reel seat to be a bit more traditional in appearance but I like the light weight ported ones with line size engraved on top as on X and DART. I've fished my X a lot now and have not once had the reel seat loosen or jam...that means it is good regardless of it not looking like it came off a bamboo rod.

I wrote speculatively about a year ago that one of these days Sage is going to introduce a rod they thinks so highly of that they ae going to paint it original RPL brown...and now they have.
 

jeep.ster

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Nice to see the new LL in action. Fish like those caught always put a nice bend in 3/4wt rod. I would rather see smaller fish caught and observe length of tip flex exclusively for the size of fish that rod would normally be used for. Then I could get real good idea if it's similar to the original LL without flexing the tip on the floor of the fly shop and watch the the salesman freak out.
 

silver creek

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Nice to see the new LL in action. Fish like those caught always put a nice bend in 3/4wt rod. I would rather see smaller fish caught and observe length of tip flex exclusively for the size of fish that rod would normally be used for. Then I could get real good idea if it's similar to the original LL without flexing the tip on the floor of the fly shop and watch the the salesman freak out.
YouTube

Watch that video at 3:22. Supporting the rod ABOVE the handle with as "assist hand is an easy way to break the rod. My opinion is that the angler is trying to land that fish before it is ready. His partner wasn't able to net the fish at that time anyway.

Because the angler unconsciously uses an assist hand twice, I suspect it is the way he often tries to gain more leverage quite frequently. Please don't do this when you fight fish.

Busted! - American AnglerAmerican Angler


Screen Shot 2019-08-02 at 2.21.24 PM.jpg



"When a rod explodes in the heat of battle, the culprit is often the angler's wandering hand creeping up the rod in an attempt to gain leverage and control. Sometimes, it feels as if the rod is bending too much, and you need to give it a hand. What really happens the second you grab the blank is a dramatic reduction in the strength and power of the fly rod.

If you put your hand up on the rod while fighting a fish, that energy is no longer being dispersed over nine feet because you've essentially cut the butt section of the rod off, and now you are asking the weaker sections of the rod to absorb all of that force, explains Johnson.

Rod Brace With Hand

Trying to brace your rod with your hand actually has the opposite of your intended effect. Interrupting the curve of the rod takes the butt section out of the equation, again forcing the weakest part of the rod to withstand tremendous pressure. (photo by Philip Monahan)

Burkheimer concurs: a fly rod is meant to be loaded in a smooth, progressive arc, all the way down to the handle, which is the strongest part of the entire rod. If that hand goes up, you lose power and you could break your rod. It's a double whammy.

The simple solution? Fight the fish from the butt of the rod, and no matter how powerful, resist the urge to slide that hand up. Instead, concentrate on applying steady, even pressure on the fish.

Once the initial frenzy of the hookup has subsided, use every available resource to bring the fish under control. Let your reel's drag work for you. Properly set, the drag will tire the fish more quickly than anything else you can do. Once the fish's first few long runs have been answered, concentrate on the fish's head. Your job here is twofold: First, turn his head. Once the fish decides he wants to go one way, you should wait for the perfect opportunity to turn him the other way. Large, powerful fish hate having their direction dictated to them, and if you can turn that fish a few times, it will often become demoralized and quit. Second, get the fish's head above water. Once the head breaks the surface, it's time to end the fight. At this point, the fish can usually be quickly brought to net. Sure, it's a lot to remember, but there's only one thing that's absolutely crucial: Keep those hands on the cork!"
 

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sweetandsalt

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Silver is spot on. Just because you own a shop and have a videographer to follow you around reviewing things does not mean you know what you are doing.
 

FlymanSJB

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I Concur, Rods are supposed to bend, they bend a lot with big fish on which is no matter, its what they are designed for, I don't get the steering thing either when people do that, using the upper hand as a pivot? maybe they should just go with two handed rods? LOL

I guess some people don't like a bent rod, which they should go with a fast larger rod I guess, I don't know. Bent to the cork for me means nice fish, and I'm using the shock absorber action of the rod. Which did happen yesterday. :) Anyway,

With a newbie doing that, or I've seen people do it with spinning rods a lot too, I'm like get your upper hand off the rod!

Actually I've seen more people do that with spinning rods come to think of it.
 

coolhand

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Silver is spot on. Just because you own a shop and have a videographer to follow you around reviewing things does not mean you know what you are doing.
Just because you are a writer, constantly name-drop, and have an opinion on everything, doesn't mean that you know what you are doing. Ease up with the criticism there "cowboy"...
 

sweetandsalt

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Just because you are a writer, constantly name-drop, and have an opinion on everything, doesn't mean that you know what you are doing. Ease up with the criticism there "cowboy"...
Are you talking to me? Every rod designer of any name will tell you that putting your hand forward up the butt section foreshortens the flex profile creating a potential shear point. A bad habit good to unlearn.

If any of you want to see a shop owner promoting a product in a video who is an excellent angler, go up to GD and check out McNerney's post about the new HeadHunter fly line.
 

onthehunt

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Anyone actually cast/fish one of these yet?

I need to pick up a few rods and among my top choices are; H3's and Trout LL's.

I've been away from Sage for so long. I just did not like when everything went fast/super fast action. Plus, they got ugly for a while too. These new rods are beautiful and if they found a way to actually make a true moderate action, small stream rod, I may be in!
 

ixoye

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I was interested in Trout LL 379, but after reading Telluride Anglers impression of the rod, my interest is gone, the new variant of the rod seems more like the faster Dart than the old LL series, I was hoping for a true moderate action small stream rod.
 

eastfly66

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Red's Fly and in particular Joe Rottter are one of the best resources for rod reviews and gear tips on the web IMO and I have found they prove to be both extremely accurate and honest. I am quite confident Joe is aware of proper technique and has the experience to judge what is acceptable and proper. There are always "two sides to a story" and to pass judgement based on observation of a video and not knowing all the facts is an assumption at best. The video does look rushed, they are at a boat launch, perhaps there are several boats waiting to come in and pissed, maybe it is a private launch and someone is not happy in the background or maybe the video guy is about to take a dump in his waders and said get this done fast.

Just for the record, I have never meet Joe Rotter, he could be an egotistical pr*ck for all I know but until than I do know he is a highly skilled caster and I find his rod/line reviews to be spot on the money.
 
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