Scandi feels like Skagit

LOC

Well-known member
Messages
133
Reaction score
24
Location
S. CA
I got my first official spey line today for my recently purchased 10' 6" 4wt trout spey. In the last few weeks I've been using a 7wt 260 grain Rio single hand spey line on it that I already owned.

I do a lot of single hand spey casting with either a standard WF line or I also have two Rio SHS lines. One is a 7wt as mentioned and the other a 4wt which BTW spends more time on my 5wt rod. I also pretty much prefer to have all my rods setup underlined when applicable So using the Rio SHS line seemed perfectly fine. It loads the rod well and I read it is not uncommon to pair this particular line with a two handed rod.

So after hours on lock down researching lines in the internet rabbit hole I decided on a SA spey lite scandi line @ 270 grains which was an ideal match for the rod's grain window. The rod maker suggest 290 for Scandi. I went Scandi over Skagit because I prefer touch and go style of casting and the trout waters I'll be fishing won't require any heavy lifting.

Lacing up the new line I was a bit taken back because the head section is pretty burly. So putting it into action It was a bit of a shocker. Initial casts feel over lined and not particularly Scandi (at least what my perception of what Scandi was until today). I honestly thought they sent me the wrong line and it was a Skagit line. But after a quick check, it's all Scandi...

Checking in on some other factors like the head length of my Rio SHS line which is a round 30' compared to this line which is around 22' perhaps I just need to get use to the shorter head and the aggressive style of load. It feels like I could knock off quite a few grains and still make a nice cast with this line. I checked the SA Skagit head length as a comparison and I can't imagine casting that line on this rod especially using the manufacturers guide line of 320 grains. That must feel like throwing OG straight lead core which I own from the OG days.

So is my newbie perception skewed by starting off with a longer bellied line on this rod? Apologies if this sounds like I'm complaining I am actually not. I'm not bummed or butt hurt either like it's the lines fault. This line casts technically fine, far and its fun to cast. It just casts a loop more like a rocket and in my Scandi mind I was expecting a glider.

I guess I am learning there are no hard and fast rules as to how you setup your two handed rod. As long as you get the fly off the water and into the right part of the water when you want it there.

Any suggestions welcomed. Thanks : ]
 
Last edited:

Ard

Administrator
Messages
19,516
Reaction score
568
Location
Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
Hi Loc,

I don't really have any suggestions more like observations..... the length of the head does sound more like a Skagit Max Short than any Scandi lines I own. My Scandi lines are all custom made Steve Godshall 45 foot bellies with integrated running lines behind. $5 is as short as I go on any of my rods 13' and over but you have a shorter rod there.

I use an 11 1/2 foot Hardy Swift more than my other rods unless I go big water or Kings and the little Hardy has a 37 foot Scandi on it. I am curious why you turned from the single hand Spey lines because I have a couple of those here too. I use them on a 9 foot 6 inch Orvis Light Salmon that has a 4" bottom cork so I cast 2 hand style with it. I love the 300 grain / 8 weight Rio line on that rod. I use the 3D nine weight on an 8 1//2 foot Bamboo Light salmon that also has the long bottom cork and it works like a dream. I would think the single hand Spey would be about perfect for your rod.

We have guys posting here who know a lot more about rods and lines than I do so I expect you'll get some decent feedback soon.
 

LOC

Well-known member
Messages
133
Reaction score
24
Location
S. CA
Hi Loc,

I don't really have any suggestions more like observations..... the length of the head does sound more like a Skagit Max Short than any Scandi lines I own. My Scandi lines are all custom made Steve Godshall 45 foot bellies with integrated running lines behind. $5 is as short as I go on any of my rods 13' and over but you have a shorter rod there.

I use an 11 1/2 foot Hardy Swift more than my other rods unless I go big water or Kings and the little Hardy has a 37 foot Scandi on it. I am curious why you turned from the single hand Spey lines because I have a couple of those here too. I use them on a 9 foot 6 inch Orvis Light Salmon that has a 4" bottom cork so I cast 2 hand style with it. I love the 300 grain / 8 weight Rio line on that rod. I use the 3D nine weight on an 8 1//2 foot Bamboo Light salmon that also has the long bottom cork and it works like a dream. I would think the single hand Spey would be about perfect for your rod.

Hi Ard, thanks for the insight much appreciated. I went and checked out the specs on the Skagit max short and yeah you are correct they are very similar in taper and length. So maybe I'm not so crazy after all regarding how this line casts.

As far as the Rio SHS line I wanted to try another type of line since I really have no comparison to how any other lines would cast on this rod. It actually works for me. Now know i can use my Rio line as my finesse line and use the SA line as a more Skagit style for larger flies.


SA spey lite Scandi







upload pic
 

flav

Well-known member
Messages
855
Reaction score
38
Location
oregon
I agree with Ard, that's pretty short for a scandi for a 10'6" rod. Scandi heads are usually about 2.5 times the length of your rod, or about 26 feet for that rod. Not that a shorter head is a bad thing. A shorter head translates to more grains per foot, and that means you're going to be able to cast heavier tips and flies than a typical scandi.

It sounds like that line casts like a scandi, though, tight loops and rocket speed are what a scandi gives you. A Skagit requires a slower, more relaxed casting stroke. It's built for moving a heavy payload, and doesn't give you the distance or speed of a scandi.

I think you're on the right track. Use your SHS (my favorite SH line) for light stuff and your new line if you want to cast stuff a bit heavier. It's probably not going to cast 10 feet of T-14 and a big fly like a Skagit would, but will cast a sinking poly leader and a moderately heavy fly very easily.
 

FlymanSJB

Well-known member
Messages
2,948
Reaction score
139
Location
L'Étoile du Nord
I agree with the guys, and looking at the line tapers there doesn't seem to be much difference. Many times depending on the rod the recommendations for lines may feel too heavy or too light depending on action.

Having a scandi that can handle poly and light sink tips, flies like a rocket is actually a pretty useful tool, I think if it feels heavy go 30 grains lighter until you like it.
 

LOC

Well-known member
Messages
133
Reaction score
24
Location
S. CA
Update, fished the SA line this morning and I'm getting use to my new dance partner.
It certainly is a dance dialing in a new line. I find myself nudging and pausing to find the magic spot placing the touch and go in a happy place. When you hit it right it goes with no effort....

Thanks for all the replies...
 

DJJJenkins

Member
Messages
13
Reaction score
3
Location
Vancouver Island
Those SA lines are all meant to be run with tips aren't they? even if it is a floating tip or floating poly leader? you may be running those already but just thought I would throw that out there in case you were not

Good luck!
 

LOC

Well-known member
Messages
133
Reaction score
24
Location
S. CA
So here's a update on the SA spey lite Scandi.
With some casting time under my belt I come to really like this line.
It's a bit of a hybrid and that it does a nice touch and go cast on my dominant side but a circle C on my non dominant side (left shoulder) throws a nice open skagit style loop. I fished it this morning and was trading off between switch casts, snake rolls and off shoulder circle C casts. It did everything equally well.
 
Top