Secrets of Fly Casting - Jimmy Green

silver creek

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Learned something! Thanks for link. I have some reading and practicing to do.

My casts improved greatly after I actually allowed the line and rod do it’s thing. I feel like I may have rushed some things causing the tailing loops. I slowed everything down, and I was consistently getting about 50’+ cast with nice presentations in the yard. I greatly appreciate it, SC!
In a previous post (below) it sound like the tailing loop occurs late in the cast with the fly or leader tangling.

my experience is more in front of me where the fly drops below the line, and it either wraps or the hook snags.
If that is true, then the cause of the tailing loop is a sudden rather than a smooth acceleration of the fly rod EARLY in the casting motion. This is actually a COMMON cause of a tailing loop for a beginning fly caster who "punches" the rod to try to get that extra amount of energy into the cast.

Remember that we need to accelerate the rod SMMMOOOOTHHHHLLLLLY. A cast should be smmooooTH with a hard STOP at the end of the cast which is represented by the "TH."

The following discussion maybe too much detail for you at this time. If so, save it and consider it later:

Aitor Coteron has done extensive video studies of tailing loops. He has a series of videos on Vimeo that demonstrate the timing of the rod tip dip during the casting stroke and the resultant timing of the tailing loops during the forward cast. In the video below, a hard and long haul is performed early in the cast.

This haul simulates the timing of a sudden acceleration during the casting stroke which would cause the same rod tip dip.

Late Tail = Early Haul.

Note in the video below that the haul causes the rod tip to dip down as the fly line suddenly accelerated by the haul. This increases the energy in the cast and the rod must bend to absorb some of this energy as potential energy. This rod tip "dip" causes the path of that section of fly line to dip BELOW the path of the rest of the fly line and the two paths eventually cross and can tangle the tailing loop late in the cast.


So now we suspect your acceleration at the start of the cast is too sudden. A common cause of early sudden acceleration and therefore late tailing loops is rod "creep". I discussed Rod Creep as a cause of tailing loops in another post which is repeated in part below.

Creep is the forward repositioning of the fly rod in the direction of the next cast, before the actual power stroke begins. Basically the caster anticipates the start of the next a cast and begins moving the rod before the actual cast. Pete Kutzer explains rod creep in the video below:


This "creep" or early rod movement shortens the rod stroke and the caster tries to get more power into too short a stroke path. The caster "jabs" or shocks the rod in an attempt to increase line speed. This sudden application of power bends the rod ===> shortens the rod ===> dips the rod tip ===> concave rod tip path ===> tailing loop.

"1. Forward Creep:

The main cause of tailing loops (in Texas) is Forward Creep. Forward Creep is beginning the forward stroke too early. Anticipating the forward cast would be a nice way of looking at it. Either way it sucks. Your backcast is travelling backwards, your rod tip is travelling forwards, the backcast straightens pulling the rod tip under the Straight Line Path and you throw a classic tailing loop."


http://www.sexyloops.com/flycasting/tailingloops.shtml

Creep is discussed as a cause of tailing loops in the FFF discussion of tailing loops:

"There is one more common casting error that leads to tailing loops, it is called "creep". At the end of either cast, but especially the back cast, it is very important to leave the rod where it stopped, or even drift farther back. This sets up the next cast and helps to get a long, smooth stroke. If the caster "creeps" the rod forward while waiting for the line to straighten, the stroke for the next cast is shortened. Shortening the stroke without reducing the power applied will result in a downward tip path which leads to tailing loops. It is very important to make sure that you leave the rod where it stops (or even drift the rod farther back) while waiting for the line to straighten."

http://www.flyfishersinternational.....Bruce Richards.pdf?ver=2012-02-23-130107-507

Rod creep can cancel the advantage of rod drift. Since we drift the rod to get a longer rod stroke and longer cast, the anticipation of the longer cast can cause the caster to creep. So be mindful of rod creep when you try for extra distance and you are get tailing loops.
 
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In a previous post (below) it sound like the tailing loop occurs late in the cast with the fly or leader tangling.



If that is true, then the cause of the tailing loop is a sudden rather than a smooth acceleration of the fly rod EARLY in the casting motion. This is actually a COMMON cause of a tailing loop for a beginning fly caster who "punches" the rod to try to get that extra amount of energy into the cast.

Remember that we need to accelerate the rod SMMMOOOOTHHHHLLLLLY. A cast should be smmooooTH with a hard STOP at the end of the cast which is represented by the "TH."

The following discussion maybe too much detail for you at this time. If so, save it and consider it later:

Aitor Coteron has done extensive video studies of tailing loops. He has a series of videos on Vimeo that demonstrate the timing of the rod tip dip during the casting stroke and the resultant timing of the tailing loops during the forward cast. In the video below, a hard and long haul is performed early in the cast.

This haul simulates the timing of a sudden acceleration during the casting stroke which would cause the same rod tip dip.

Late Tail = Early Haul.

Note in the video below that the haul causes the rod tip to dip down as the fly line suddenly accelerated by the haul. This increases the energy in the cast and the rod must bend to absorb some of this energy as potential energy. This rod tip "dip" causes the path of that section of fly line to dip BELOW the path of the rest of the fly line and the two paths eventually cross and can tangle the tailing loop late in the cast.


So now we suspect your acceleration at the start of the cast is too sudden. A common cause of early sudden acceleration and therefore late tailing loops is rod "creep". I discussed Rod Creep as a cause of tailing loops in another post which is repeated in part below.

Creep is the forward repositioning of the fly rod in the direction of the next cast, before the actual power stroke begins. Basically the caster anticipates the start of the next a cast and begins moving the rod before the actual cast. Pete Kutzer explains rod creep in the video below:


This "creep" or early rod movement shortens the rod stroke and the caster tries to get more power into too short a stroke path. The caster "jabs" or shocks the rod in an attempt to increase line speed. This sudden application of power bends the rod ===> shortens the rod ===> dips the rod tip ===> concave rod tip path ===> tailing loop.

"1. Forward Creep:

The main cause of tailing loops (in Texas) is Forward Creep. Forward Creep is beginning the forward stroke too early. Anticipating the forward cast would be a nice way of looking at it. Either way it sucks. Your backcast is travelling backwards, your rod tip is travelling forwards, the backcast straightens pulling the rod tip under the Straight Line Path and you throw a classic tailing loop."


http://www.sexyloops.com/flycasting/tailingloops.shtml

Creep is discussed as a cause of tailing loops in the FFF discussion of tailing loops:

"There is one more common casting error that leads to tailing loops, it is called "creep". At the end of either cast, but especially the back cast, it is very important to leave the rod where it stopped, or even drift farther back. This sets up the next cast and helps to get a long, smooth stroke. If the caster "creeps" the rod forward while waiting for the line to straighten, the stroke for the next cast is shortened. Shortening the stroke without reducing the power applied will result in a downward tip path which leads to tailing loops. It is very important to make sure that you leave the rod where it stops (or even drift the rod farther back) while waiting for the line to straighten."

http://www.flyfishersinternational.....Bruce Richards.pdf?ver=2012-02-23-130107-507

Rod creep can cancel the advantage of rod drift. Since we drift the rod to get a longer rod stroke and longer cast, the anticipation of the longer cast can cause the caster to creep. So be mindful of rod creep when you try for extra distance and you are get tailing loops.
Again, thanks so much. The sun is down now, and I’m going to work on this tomorrow and check on these tips. All the help is greatly appreciated!


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