Spey Casting?

Hirdy

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Spey casting is a hybrid of roll casting and "normal" casting which enables very quick changes of direction and casting in confined spaces. Some of the casts are "jump roll casts" and some are like roll casts with an extra large D-loop. What all spey casts have in common is an "anchor" of some sort, where the leader/fly is in contact with the water as the forward cast is initiated.

They can all be done with single hand rods if you want, but most of the information you'll find out there is based on using two handed rods.

Cheers,
Graeme
 

Bigfly

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To me, the main difference between the two styles, is fly casting mainly is linear motion......straight overhead, straight away roll cast, or straight waterload.
Spey is circular......
Which was a nice change after 30 or so years of casting...........
Casting the "old" way had become totally boring, and I was ready to give up fishing.......
Spey has opened up a whole world of fun for me.
And dry fly fishing on a shorter stick was a rebirth with all the new casts.
Every year I help guys convert to Spey....and many never go back.....
Why leave flies in bushes.......?

Jim
 

Hirdy

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The casts themselves are the same with each of the styles mentioned by Steve Rajeff: it's really just the length of the head that changes. And the casts in the "Spey family" can be made with any line and any rod (except the hauled Speys, called "turbo spey" by Simon Gawesworth. These need a single hand rod.)

Cheers,
Graeme
 

pnc

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Most recent thread I found. That this might be appropriate. Trying to understand what spey casting is. From what threads I've looked at. Looks like long roll casting is idea. Or are other forms employed ? Oval type, constant pressure kind of things. When 100' casts are made. What cast is being spoken of ?

Tia....... pc
 

fredaevans

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Most recent thread I found. That this might be appropriate. Trying to understand what spey casting is. From what threads I've looked at. Looks like long roll casting is idea. Or are other forms employed ? Oval type, constant pressure kind of things. When 100' casts are made. What cast is being spoken of ?

Tia....... pc
Tia with a 'good caster' it could be any of the three. Major difference is how you want to fish and the available free air space you have to work with.

Just my view/opin to follow so 'other's milage many vary ,...

Traditional lines will usually be 120 foot long and usually a full floater. General use will be surface or just sub-surface flies, leader(s) can be very long.

Scandi's are a short head with a standard front taper of some sort. Again surface or just sub surface flies down to 3, maybe 4, feet with weighted flies (not 'bricks!).

Skagit heads ... pull out the 'bricks' you have in your fly box. Short/blunt tip/most of grain weight will be 'right up front.' Really tight fishing conditions this is the baby BUT it (unlike the two above) takes some serious practice. Great tendency is the caster will over power the cast and pull the head/leader/fly right out of the water. Not a good 'Plan A.'

If I had to recommend a given line type for the newbie/casual caster I'd go with a Scandi. Coin flip on how long the head, lot of that has to do with the length of the rod. Longer/longer head, etc.
 

JoJer

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One picture is worth less than a vid. Google Spey distance casting and take a look. Once you get past the distance that a good spey caster can reach, notice also that you don't have to continually spool line, then pull it back out. The line you cast stays out and the rod is "water loaded". I'm not good at it but it's fun.
 

Hirdy

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Most recent thread I found. That this might be appropriate. Trying to understand what spey casting is. From what threads I've looked at. Looks like long roll casting is idea. Or are other forms employed ? Oval type, constant pressure kind of things. When 100' casts are made. What cast is being spoken of ?

Tia....... pc
My first post in this thread (second post from the top) is how I summarise it. A hybrid of roll casting and overhead casting which enables a change of direction. The change of direction is the common theme.

All the spey family casts are suitable for casting to 100', but not every caster is capable of those distances.

BTW, spey casts can be made with single hand rods and lines. You don't need special rods and lines to perform them. "Scandi" and "Skagit" lines are generally lines being marketed to the two-handed casters.

Cheers,
Graeme
 

Ard

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One picture is worth less than a vid.


Here's a guy fishing, what you see is a 45' super Scandi line being followed by an orange vinyl coated shooting line that the angler has just released. On the front of the fly line is a 15' long leader with a fly on the tip. That cast is still climbing and it unfurled completely.

I couldn't resist, I don't have any other photos like that but when you are on truly large rivers you can cast a fly as far as your ability will allow. I find it a very relaxing way to fish.
 

fredaevans

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Here's a guy fishing, what you see is a 45' super Scandi line being followed by an orange vinyl coated shooting line that the angler has just released. On the front of the fly line is a 15' long leader with a fly on the tip. That cast is still climbing and it unfurled completely.

I couldn't resist, I don't have any other photos like that but when you are on truly large rivers you can cast a fly as far as your ability will allow. I find it a very relaxing way to fish.
Not sure but looks like me.

fae
 

huronfly

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Lol. If I have to... I prefer the snake roll.

Most recent thread I found. That this might be appropriate. Trying to understand what spey casting is. From what threads I've looked at. Looks like long roll casting is idea. Or are other forms employed ? Oval type, constant pressure kind of things. When 100' casts are made. What cast is being spoken of ?

Tia....... pc
Touch and go casts generate higher line speeds so that is normally what is used. Eg: single spey, or snake roll.
 

davidgreams

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The cast I'm trying to go for is a Snap T.

Since the last, I have switched from a 400 grain OPST Commando head (16.5') to a 23' RIO 550 grain Skagit Max head. I've found that with a 13' rod, it's easier to maintain an anchor with a longer head.

I also have been trying to pause, allowing the D loop to align with the direction of travel. It seems that the rod seems to unload at the height of the sweep, only to reload when it moves forward. Is this correct?

The last thing that I have been working on has been a tighter sweep and forward cast, keeping my arms inside the phone booth. I had a problem using my right hand to power the forward cast, and I've tried to correct that by using my left hand to rotate the rod around my right hand, instead of vice versa.
 

ia_trouter

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The cast I'm trying to go for is a Snap T.

Since the last, I have switched from a 400 grain OPST Commando head (16.5') to a 23' RIO 550 grain Skagit Max head. I've found that with a 13' rod, it's easier to maintain an anchor with a longer head.

I also have been trying to pause, allowing the D loop to align with the direction of travel. It seems that the rod seems to unload at the height of the sweep, only to reload when it moves forward. Is this correct?

The last thing that I have been working on has been a tighter sweep and forward cast, keeping my arms inside the phone booth. I had a problem using my right hand to power the forward cast, and I've tried to correct that by using my left hand to rotate the rod around my right hand, instead of vice versa.
You should start your own thread. Your questions are specific and I am very sure you will get a lot of help from the forum.
 

Bigfly

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The Snap-T is golden......I have begun to teach it instead of that silly overhand cast....
The longer head helps a lot with blown anchors.
I do not wait too long on the D loop positioning.
The loop should neither be expanding, not collapsing, when you begin your power stroke.
Peek out of the corner of your eye......timing is an issue when we get to going.
I had a bad extension problem when I started. My coach suggested I loosen my wading belt and stick my casting arm through it. Remember....lever and fulcrum. It's amazing how much power is available when ya get it right...!!
In addition to making a Spey cast better, keeping your elbow down helps with the single hand cast too.
My hands are always down now!

Jim
 
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