Strike Indicators

LePetomane

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What does everyone use for strike indicators? I’ve tried everything from Thingamabobbers to the adhesive/foam ones and finally found one that I like. It’s the New Zealand indicator. It’s floating yarn and a plastic sleeve that requires a special tool. A pain in the butt to put on but these things float well and don’t mess up one’s cast. You can even apply floatant to them.
 

goofnoff1

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I've mostly used the foam but I'm anxious to try the NZ and Thingamabobbers.

I think of them as suspenders. Let me ask. How do you use them?ue

I also use a Mohawk as an indicator.
 
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dswice

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The CorQ Strike indicators are my preference over the Thingamabobbers. I've heard good things about the yarn/wool style indicators, but have not tried them.
 

tomsakai

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I used a small cork indicator on a small stream last week. I found that it was spooking the fish. Switched to a foam indicator, much better. I usually use airlock indicators on large rivers. Used to use rubber bands and yarn, similar to the NZ system but have gotten lazy.
 

Teeth

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I dont use them often, but I have become quite fond of the NZ style. Floats well and super easy to cast without the threat of spooking fish.
 

LePetomane

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For me the indicator serves to get the nymph deep and detect the strike. While I prefer a dry/dropper, I use an indicator when I want to get the nymph deep. I only use the dry/dropper combination down to 18 inches. They don’t make a big splash when they hit the water.
 

ryc72

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The indicators that the guy on troutbitten makes are great. Very similar to the nz indis but without the plastic sleeve. In its place I just use a small orthodontic rubber band to create a small loop in my leader and stick the indi in there and tighten the loop. It’s surprising how much weight it can float and if pretreated with floatant it can float for a long time. I’ve found the nz indi loses its buoyancy a lot quicker than the poly yarn.
 

Davebuech

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If i am reduced to strickly nymph fishing I use the yarn indicator with orthodontist bands (ala Pat Dorsey style) in clear or slower waters where trout can be spooky or for the subtle takers. They can freeze up and sink in the winter so i will switch to Thingamabobbers. I also use Thingys in fast turbulent waters in warmer temps.
The nice thing about the yarn and rubber bands is that they dont leave a kink in the line when u remove or slide them.
 

Bam Boozelled

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Foam Airlocks, they land a little hard but they float anything, are easily adjustable, no kinking, and they are also reusable.
 

silver creek

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What does everyone use for strike indicators? I’ve tried everything from Thingamabobbers to the adhesive/foam ones and finally found one that I like. It’s the New Zealand indicator. It’s floating yarn and a plastic sleeve that requires a special tool. A pain in the butt to put on but these things float well and don’t mess up one’s cast. You can even apply floatant to them.
First a little history.

The NZ indicator was actually invented by an American from California named Rudy Ferris. Who ever markets the NZ Indicator saw an opportunity to market it. The Ferris indicator used the empty plastic ink tubes from used ball point pen cartridges. It was described in an article about in 2005.

The story is here:


Secondly, there is no reason to buy a NZ Indicator. They can easily be made with a few items.

Here is the Ferris Indicator I made.



The mono loop is for hanging the indicator tool from a zinger.

To make a strike indicator, double the leader to form a loop and place the loop through the slot at the end of the tool. Push the first silicon tube forward and pull the leader loop through the silicon tube using the tool. Then strike indicator yarn is place through the mono loop and pulled back through the tube.

The indicator can be moved along the leader and locked into place.





Rather than buy the NZSI, I make my own based on Rudi’s design using the materials below.



The wooden beads and needles were bought at Hobby Lobby. I use the Bates Weaving Needle because it can be cut to length. Yarn needles can be used but they result in shorter tools.

I used Amnesia for the mono loop. An old section of leader butt can also be used. Two part epoxy and hollow silicone tubing complete the material list.

The proper sized silicon tubing can be obtained on Ebay for a few dollars or aquarium tubing from a pet store can also be used. For the Bates needle, a 2mm Inner Diameter tubing is used. For other needles, measure the diameter of the needle eye and use that for the ID of the silicone tubing.



Copy and paste the following URL into your web browser to find silicone tubing or search the "auction site" for "Silicone Food Grade Tube." If you already own a indicator, this is a cheap way to get tubing for your indicator.


To make the tool, use a small file or Dremel Tool to cut a slot into the butt end of needle. Then cut the needle to length if it is too long. Cut a section of thick mono for the hanger loop. Place the ends into the end of the bead, and glue the end of the needle and mono into the bead using epoxy.

After the epoxy cures, cut the silicone tubing into sections and load them onto the indicator tool.

 

100954

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Another for the Dorsey indicator. But I find it easier to double the rubber band Around the opposite end of a bodkin which I keep in my vest, four or five times, then insert a small loop of line into the hole in the end of the bodkin, then roll the rubber band over the loop.
 

JoJer

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I tried lots of stuff and settled on small Lil Corkies. I cut a slot to the center and peg it with a tooth pick that I bite off to size. I also paint the bottoms with flat black/sharpie. With the slot, I can take it off and move it around knots in the leader. No kinks. The fish seemed to get really POed when they hit the indicator.
I made some yarn indicators with a Harbor Freight multi sized plastic O rings. One for the loop to tie on with and another around the wool. I made a few with strips of pink craft foam.



I made a handful and gave them all away. I don't think I ever fished one.
I have a few of these, too.
 
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flav

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I use Airlocks for most of my river fishing, they're a great upgrade from thingamabobbers.

I use quick release indicators like the Phil Rowley version on stillwater so I can fish deeper water.
 

rangerrich99

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99% of the time I use a hopper, PMX, Gypsy King, etc. Some largish terrestrial fly. If I'm going to throw it out there, it might as well have a hook on it.

For that rare situation where I can't do that, I use a NZ. I like being able to adjust the size of the float just by pulling off what I need, and the fact that I can still cast like a fly-fisherman with the things on there. I also like that they're incredibly sensitive; even the tiniest nudge is easily seen with NZs. And finally, NZs can even be used as an indicator in front of those too-small-to-see dry flies.
 

MDC183

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I use the lightning strike football indicators. I have tried nearly everything from airlocks to nz style indicators and I think that the foam football indicators work the best for the streams that I fish (small to medium wild trout streams). They cast well, are easily adjustable, do not kink your leader, and come in tons of colors and sizes to fit many applications.
 

leadfootedfool

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I’m on team hopper, and the longer I’ve been doing that the more fish I seem to get to get on the dry. If nothing else is working, and I have to use an indicator, I like the NZ style.
 

el jefe

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First a little history.

The NZ indicator was actually invented by an American from California named Rudy Ferris. Who ever markets the NZ Indicator saw an opportunity to market it. The Ferris indicator used the empty plastic ink tubes from used ball point pen cartridges. It was described in an article about in 2005.

The story is here:


Secondly, there is no reason to buy a NZ Indicator. They can easily be made with a few items.

Here is the Ferris Indicator I made.



The mono loop is for hanging the indicator tool from a zinger.

To make a strike indicator, double the leader to form a loop and place the loop through the slot at the end of the tool. Push the first silicon tube forward and pull the leader loop through the silicon tube using the tool. Then strike indicator yarn is place through the mono loop and pulled back through the tube.

The indicator can be moved along the leader and locked into place.





Rather than buy the NZSI, I make my own based on Rudi’s design using the materials below.



The wooden beads and needles were bought at Hobby Lobby. I use the Bates Weaving Needle because it can be cut to length. Yarn needles can be used but they result in shorter tools.

I used Amnesia for the mono loop. An old section of leader butt can also be used. Two part epoxy and hollow silicone tubing complete the material list.

The proper sized silicon tubing can be obtained on Ebay for a few dollars or aquarium tubing from a pet store can also be used. For the Bates needle, a 2mm Inner Diameter tubing is used. For other needles, measure the diameter of the needle eye and use that for the ID of the silicone tubing.



Copy and paste the following URL into your web browser to find silicone tubing or search the "auction site" for "Silicone Food Grade Tube." If you already own a indicator, this is a cheap way to get tubing for your indicator.


To make the tool, use a small file or Dremel Tool to cut a slot into the butt end of needle. Then cut the needle to length if it is too long. Cut a section of thick mono for the hanger loop. Place the ends into the end of the bead, and glue the end of the needle and mono into the bead using epoxy.

After the epoxy cures, cut the silicone tubing into sections and load them onto the indicator tool.

Well done, but it sure seems like a lot of work (especially in pursuit of materials) compared to a system that costs less than $20. If you have most of the materials on hand already, that's a pretty slick little project.
 

el jefe

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The indicators that the guy on troutbitten makes are great. Very similar to the nz indis but without the plastic sleeve. In its place I just use a small orthodontic rubber band to create a small loop in my leader and stick the indi in there and tighten the loop. It’s surprising how much weight it can float and if pretreated with floatant it can float for a long time. I’ve found the nz indi loses its buoyancy a lot quicker than the poly yarn.
Try substituting the poly yarn in the NZ system. There is nothing that says the NZ wool has to be used with the NZ system. I have experimented with many different materials for the NZ system.
 

corn fed fins

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I make my own. Silver's video post is really the same one I follow. I use yarn in slow deep water and winter(unless it's below freezing) where delicate strikes are the norm. Most sensitive set-up.

I use the small unpainted Corqs (or no indicator) when on high pressured waters. The natural cork color looks like drifting debris. Can be difficult to see with increasing distances but it's not like I'm blind casting.

I jump to airlocks or thingamabobbers when fishing deep or heavy flies in faster water. Especially tungsten stones in the spring. The others just can't float the weight. Unless you use the BIG ones and for me it's horrible on my lob cast.

On lakes I use slip indicators (wished I knew about them a long time ago. lol) when I want to hinge a rig at a specific depth.

I also run about ~5 feet of heavier mono as a rail for the indicator. Too much though and mending can become a pain in the arse. This way I can adjust a few feet either way for depth and also puts some distance between the fly line and the fish to reduce that "Oh crap" lining scenario with a bad lob.

CFF
 
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