Sustainable fly fishing

Acheron

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Keep that mono master handy, I have four of them. Seeing wads of Mono streamside is certainly disturbing, I generally put it in my backpack, I wish they would outlaw canned beer, especially Bud Light. At least we could all put a big return reward on cans and bottles.
Our society, as a whole, has decided that it is not important to teach those values, there is no money to be made there, and your job is to consume. It's more important to be good at hitting a baseball, treating hair loss, low T, or ED, giving botox shots, or "influencing". if you have not seen the movie Idiocracy, it might as well be a documentary.

BTW, it's not Bud Light specifically...it's regional. In TX it's Lone Star, in IL it was Bud Light, in CO it's Coors or Modelo. It really is too bad alcohol prohibition failed.

I always take line, tippet, etc. that I find, it's usually attached to a fly or lure which I consider a token for my effort ;) In addition, I have an old vest where I have attached almost all of the found flies and lures to over the years. I've found a couple of tools as well. There is no room left on the vest :D :D I'll have to get a pic of it some time.
 

Unknownflyman

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I have often thought of this, that's why I save all my mono scraps, and my flies are fur and feather and metal as much as possible. Cheap plastic biodegrades, so a bit of craft fur or flash isn't keeping me up at night.

Surprisingly enough, after tying and fishing some modern plastic flashy flies, fur and feather seems to work better. For me.

You know they banned lead shot here for hunting and there is talk of banning rifle bullets, I don't know how a 30 caliber rifle bullet passing through a deers vitals contaminates all the meat but I suppose it could poison the animals that eat the gut pile I suppose that could happen but unlikely but the narrative that venison is dangerousI dont believe it. Shotgun slugs yeah more lead, less velocity but when it comes to lead sinkers in Minnesota they won't touch it.

I have very little lead sinkers left, in general- for walleye/perch or fly fishing. I dont really use them, figuring I- 99.9% fish streamers/wets and dry flies I dont need them, brass cone heads or tungsten.

But I am more concerned about lead sinkers than one rifle bullet fired every year. sabot slugs are an improvement Steel shot has improved, but I`m still a lousy grouse hunter.
 
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redietz

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Actually, that's a good point. I see way more beer cans and beer bottles and the like than I do tippet. I rarely see tippet or mono. I occasionally see it hung up in trees, but that's about it. But beer cans and beer bottles are everywhere. Last weekend, even saw dirty diapers. Ah, nothing like the great outdoors!!
Those things are easier to see. I have to look for it, but I find discarded leaders and lengths of tippet pretty much every place that I park to fish. (I pick it up and dispose of it properly.)
 

Spec

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If an activity caused me that much stress I'd find a different way to spend my time.
I'm not stressed just thoughtful :)

Ever heard the term "Leave no trace"? There became so many people out on the trails it was harmful to the environment. The backpacking/hiking community took on an educational process teaching people how to have minimal impact.

I think the same type of environmental awareness is needed in fly fishing.
 

el jefe

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Our society, as a whole, has decided that it is not important to teach those values, there is no money to be made there, and your job is to consume. It's more important to be good at hitting a baseball, treating hair loss, low T, or ED, giving botox shots, or "influencing". if you have not seen the movie Idiocracy, it might as well be a documentary.

BTW, it's not Bud Light specifically...it's regional. In TX it's Lone Star, in IL it was Bud Light, in CO it's Coors or Modelo. It really is too bad alcohol prohibition failed.

I always take line, tippet, etc. that I find, it's usually attached to a fly or lure which I consider a token for my effort ;) In addition, I have an old vest where I have attached almost all of the found flies and lures to over the years. I've found a couple of tools as well. There is no room left on the vest :D :D I'll have to get a pic of it some time.
I couldn't disagree more. Environmental consciousness is at an all-time high. It's on the front page of our newspapers, it's in print and television advertising. Whole magazines, books, movies and TV shows are devoted to it. Everyone pimps their green credentials, and companies have C-suite level managers whose sole job is sustainability. Sustainability/green credentials/environmental consciousness/corporate carbon footprints/carbon offsets are regular and expected disclosures in corporate annual reports. It's impossible these days to be even casually exposed to a company without getting their message about the part they're doing to help the environment. New car companies are solely devoted to environmentally friendly transportation (if you ignore that the electricity on which they run still has to be produced), bike lanes are being added in every city to provide alternatives to carbon-burning modes of transportation. So many environmental laws have been passed in the last few decades that it's staggering, and nobody can keep up with it. Depending on where you are at, construction costs have increased thousands of dollars to comply with new environmental mandates. There are hundreds of environmental advocacy organizations. It takes years to get some projects off the ground and adds hugely to the cost due to the environmental impact studies that must be completed first, and when those are done the lawsuits from Wild Earth Guardians and the Nature Conservancy et al must be navigated. An entire political party is devoted to environmental issues, and there is growing support for an outsized political act, the Green New Deal. There is an international, inter-governmental consortium whose mission is to address environmental issues. Most national governments have a large agency whose mission is environmental protections. Many universities now have environmental sciences curricula, and environmentalism is taught starting at the elementary school level, often to the detriment of the three Rs. We even have a day in April devoted to the earth.

OH, our society has decided it's very important to teach those values.

The truth is that no matter how strenuously one teaches any set of values, in any significantly-sized population, 100% observance and compliance will never be attained without exceptionally penal, totalitarian enforcement. You can't even get to 50% with onerous enforcement. But the one thing we don't need to worry about is those values not being taught; they are now an integral part of our culture.
 

fatbillybob

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I never thought about the lifespan of mono/fluro. If we just throw it away instead of leave it by the stream are really doing any better? Isn't the stuff going to live in the landfill for 1000 years in somone else's back yard? We could be bigger abusers by using and fishing mono/fluro everyday, as the truely devoted, than the once a year flyfishermen who breaks off his tippet in the trees. I don't think we occupy the moral high ground just because we pack out our mono. Is there a solution?
 

Nonno

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If we just throw it away instead of leave it by the stream are really doing any better? Isn't the stuff going to live in the landfill for 1000 years in somone else's back yard?
Don't get me started on "Land Fills"! Unfortunately our economy can not function without them, so yes we are doing a little bit better for the environment by keeping all of our trash in one place, instead of scattered and affecting other life forms.
I don't like it, and the best I can do is to attempt to keep my contributions to the land fill, and the environment to a minimum.
 

fatbillybob

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the best I can do is to attempt to keep my contributions to the land fill, and the environment to a minimum.
Learned this in the Boy Scouts and always try to abide in nature - "Leave only footprints and take only memories."
I agree with trying to limit one's footprint on the planet. But if we really believed that we would also stop harassing fish. Those in control of our national parks are on a campaign to erradicate non-native species. They are killing our non-native trout in places like Yellowstone national park to replace them with the original precious fish. When will the National parks outlaw fishing in the parks to protect the native species from the likes of you and me? You can't hunt in the parks why should you be able to fish? A certain segment of Americans are taking over and our long standing traditions are looked on with disdain and horror. The next logical step will be to outlaw that which they make unpopular. Can we be too "green"...maybe?
 

omas

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I'm not stressed just thoughtful :)

Ever heard the term "Leave no trace"? There became so many people out on the trails it was harmful to the environment. The backpacking/hiking community took on an educational process teaching people how to have minimal impact.

I think the same type of environmental awareness is needed in fly fishing.
100% agree with "leave no trace", I was taught this at a young age and try very hard to achieve when in the outdoors.
I was also taught to "leave it better than you found it"; so I end up picking up trash left by the other guy. :(
 
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Classtime

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I do feel a bit guilty about plastics. And also about driving 60 miles to the nearest trout streams. Most of my fishing lately has been in the ocean which is a bike ride away and my boat is powered by sail or oar. I agree with FBB and observe some scary tendencies in recent policies that discourage recreational use of natural resources which effectively reduces public participation and hence observation of commercial abuses. When we are not in the water to observe the degradation, it is unlikely to get reported.
 

wonkydaze

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Nylon will break down faster than fluoro, but it still takes hundreds of years to biodegrade. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it's not there. Our entire environment has been impacted by microplastics. Air, sea, snowpack, our food, etc. From a global perspective, the impact recreational fishing has on our plastics problem is trivial. Larger contributors are single use plastics and the commercial fishing industries. Regardless, I still try to be responsible and try my best not to leave any mono behind when fishing.

Fluoro takes much longer to break down and biodegrade than nylon. If someone loses a spool of fluoro tippet in the woods, there is a far higher likelihood that wildlife will eventually get tangled up in it because it takes that much longer for it to become brittle and break down. This would make nylon a better choice for those who might be concerned about these types of impacts.
 

stenacron

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I admire the efforts here and fully agree with El Jefe - coming from someone working in the mining industry for over 30 years, focus on sustainability and doing things in a responsible manner has never been higher. And I am happy to report that actions are being taken. Mining companies and their suppliers are signatories to organizations at the forefront of global sustainability and net zero is the ultimate goal.

Now when I say net zero is the ultimate goal... this is the same as saying zero highway deaths is the ultimate goal for the DOT of each state. It's the goal, but you have to know that the goal will probably never be met. Thus, the ultimate goal is to do the best we can on every level.

As a "fly the flag" member of our company's sustainability initiative and self-proclaimed tree-hugger, I can tell you that it is a SLIPPERY SLOPE! A lot of mono-talk on here, but really every piece of equipment we use was mined, unless it was grown. On average, studies show that producing 1 ton of steel produces 1.9 tons of carbon dioxide.

As we often say, "There is no free lunch"... example: Mining is experiencing a boom at the moment. New mines around the world are being approved and what is driving this surge? Green Energy:

Wind Turbine.jpg
 

el jefe

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I admire the efforts here and fully agree with El Jefe - coming from someone working in the mining industry for over 30 years, focus on sustainability and doing things in a responsible manner has never been higher. And I am happy to report that actions are being taken. Mining companies and their suppliers are signatories to organizations at the forefront of global sustainability and net zero is the ultimate goal.

Now when I say net zero is the ultimate goal... this is the same as saying zero highway deaths is the ultimate goal for the DOT of each state. It's the goal, but you have to know that the goal will probably never be met. Thus, the ultimate goal is to do the best we can on every level.

As a "fly the flag" member of our company's sustainability initiative and self-proclaimed tree-hugger, I can tell you that it is a SLIPPERY SLOPE! A lot of mono-talk on here, but really every piece of equipment we use was mined, unless it was grown. On average, studies show that producing 1 ton of steel produces 1.9 tons of carbon dioxide.

As we often say, "There is no free lunch"... example: Mining is experiencing a boom at the moment. New mines around the world are being approved and what is driving this surge? Green Energy:

View attachment 36271
Excellent post!! I never thought I would agree with a "self-proclaimed tree hugger," but you make excellent points. Your outlook is informed by facts and reality. What I tire of is when introducing the realistic trade-offs and being labelled an "anti-environmentalist," or someone who just wants to pollute; nobody wants to do that. I don't want to pay for my groceries, either, but I find myself doing it every week because, well, that's the only way to get them.
 

Classtime

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This is worth watching:
I've always thought that the hillsides covered with turbines were ugly and my last trip up north let me see how ugly the acres of solar panels are when they replace desert and cactus. Ugly is one thing. Dirty technology dressed up as clean and green is a menace. There is no profit in decreasing consumption. Like there is no profit in preventing cancer. $ flows to the profit takers and away from solutions. :(
 
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