taping ferrules

Max L

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what is the deal with this, does everyone do this or just some people

I picked up a 14ft 8 wt, over the winter, practices with it a couple of times since, one out of two times I noticed the
ferrules loosened up a bit from casting,

if you do tape them, what is your procedure and what tape do you use
 

trev

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From my perspective, a non spey long time roll caster, keeping the joint closed is a great idea, however you do it.
Roll casting in any form, or by whatever name, torques the the rod and, if you will, "unscrews" the connection, a loose ferrule will break, so do something to prevent that ferrule from twisting or becoming loose.
For forty years or so I've used wax on my single hand rods and checked them frequently and gotten by fine, but given the added length and weight of one of those rods, you bet I'd tape it with electrical tape.

a couple older discussions
To Tape or Not to Tape that is the question
Candle wax on your ferrules?
 
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Ard

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Hi Max,

You're going to get mixed replies on this. I have never taped and none of my rods come loose. If your rod comes loose every time there are 2 possible causes. One would be the ferrules are faulty which is somewhat rare. Two would be that your casting stroke needs to slow down - become smoother and be free of twisting motions. Too much redirection during a cast results in very high torque values being applied to the entire rod shaft. Because your rod is multi piece with joints the torque will cause them to twist.

I believe that the most desirable remedy to loose joints is to work slowly with your casting and develop a sense of timing that will help to eliminate high twist torque.

This would be an example of what I call slow and smooth casting.

 

silver creek

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I don't know if this applies to two handed rods, but with traditional single handed rods, I can tell when a ferrule is loosening.

The rod feels "mushy." Then I look down the guides, and they will not be lined up.

I have found that rod guides loosen when I roll cast or use an oval casting (Belgian) motion. I always wax my ferrules so they don't lock up.
 

duker

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Ard and Trev both have good advice, tho' contradictory. Almost all of the two-handed guys I know either tape or wax, if only out of an abundance of caution. I use wax and always check my ferrules regularly during a day of fishing. As Ard suggests, once your casting improves and you slow things down you don't need to worry (as much) about ferrules coming loose. But I still use wax, and I still check.

If the inimitable Fred Evans were here he'd chime in immediately and tell you in no uncertain terms that if you don't wax or tape you will end up regretting it.

Scott
 

Ard

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Ard and Trev both have good advice, tho' contradictory. Almost all of the two-handed guys I know either tape or wax, if only out of an abundance of caution. I use wax and always check my ferrules regularly during a day of fishing. As Ard suggests, once your casting improves and you slow things down you don't need to worry (as much) about ferrules coming loose. But I still use wax, and I still check.

If the inimitable Fred Evans were here he'd chime in immediately and tell you in no uncertain terms that if you don't wax or tape you will end up regretting it.

Scott
I think Trev and I were typing at the same time :)

I'm a pariah among 2 hand casters because I don't wax either, I do however pay attention and look for misaligned guides while I fish. I think it's a matter of casting style / technique primarily and with each passing year I refine my efforts even more. I'm so smooth now I even impress myself :D The video clip was shot 6 seasons ago on the Rogue River and yes I did stop and hang out with Fred while in the neighborhood :)
 

trev

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Ard and Trev both have good advice, tho' contradictory. Almost all of the two-handed guys I know either tape or wax, if only out of an abundance of caution. I use wax and always check my ferrules regularly during a day of fishing. As Ard suggests, once your casting improves and you slow things down you don't need to worry (as much) about ferrules coming loose. But I still use wax, and I still check.

If the inimitable Fred Evans were here he'd chime in immediately and tell you in no uncertain terms that if you don't wax or tape you will end up regretting it.

Scott
I don't think Ard and I were contradictory at all, he also says
. Too much redirection during a cast results in very high torque values being applied to the entire rod shaft. Because your rod is multi piece with joints the torque will cause them to twist.
He does tell you how to avoid this by fixing your cast stroke, and I made the assumption that slowing down isn't a part of most anglers approach, in the Mo. trout parks I've had opportunity to observe literally thousands of fly fishers from many states over the years and the single common trait is they are all moving too fast.
I often use drastic change of direction for upstream and back hand rollcasting and wax ferrules in anticipation that I will create torque. I also use the Belgian cast a lot and as S.C. noted that does the same thing and for the same reason of excessive change in direction. Along with waxing cleaning of ferrules is never to skipped. Dirt that I can't even see can ruin a perfectly fitted ferrule.
 

duker

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Sorry for any confusion--what I meant was that trev waxes and Ard doesn't. Both of you have good reasons for doing it your way.

Whether your wax or tape or don't, I do think you need to check your ferrules periodically.

Scott
 

flav

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I'm in the no tape (and no wax) crowd. I know many other Spey guys and no one I know uses tape, although a few use wax. I've run into a few guys on the river with taped ferrules, but only a few. My rods all stay together, though, and none twist from the casting motion, so I have no need for tape. The guys I see using it use electrical tape, clear if they can find it, and spiral up and back down over itself. Don't tighten it too much, it's only there to keep things in place, and overtightening can put serious pressure on your rod.
 

Max L

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thanks for the replies, I do use bees wax on my ferrules , and I am by no means smooth, slick, or even slightly talented at this
I guess time will tell, and more practice will not hurt

I'll just keep an eye on them and if they keep getting loose I'll have to bring some tape
 

FlymanSJB

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No tape, I wax my glass rods, not graphite.

Put them together well, a brief check every few hours, normally I`m cleaning ice out of the guides anyway spring to fall.

No issues, a number of times I have a hard time getting them apart, have to dunk them in the river to cool them down and get them apart.
 

fng in ak

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I wax the ferrules on my graphite rods -- both single-hand and two-hand -- so that they don't come apart when I don't want them to, and do come apart when I do want them to. I also taped the top two ferrules on my two-hand rods, when I started spey casting, but stopped that when I got a little better ("smoother", as Ard would say) with my cast, and noticed less torque being applied. When I did tape, I didn't use electrical tape because of the mess that the adhesive would make. Instead, I used automotive "emergency repair" tape that has no adhesive -- it just sticks to itself and to other materials (the rod) like plastic wrap does. (Only, of course, this tape is a lot thicker and stronger, so it's not much of a PITA to manipulate.
 

dynaflow

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I don't know one person who tapes their rods,but most certainly do wax the ferrules.If you don't think waxing the ferrules is necessary,go to the tropics somewhere for a fortnight and leave your 4pc.rods assembled for that duration without waxing
....then have some fun getting them apart when you're ready to leave.
 

hvenegaard

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I agree with these recommandations from Echo´s web page:

Rajeff Sports would like your ECHO experience to be a good one and we ask that you take care of your equipment with the following regular maintenance:

Wash all components with warm freshwater after each days use in saltwater. Pay extra attention to the space where the guides meet the blank and the metal parts of the reel seat. Try to keep sand and dirt out of the ferrules. Occasionally use a few drops of any reel oil or grease on the reel seat threads to keep it operating smoothly. Paraffin wax can also be used on the ferrules if needed to ensure a proper fit.

Do not use tape on your ferrules. If you do we’ll come steal all your bacon and PBR.
 
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