The 'Snap-T' Cast

fredaevans

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I prefer the Circle Spey or C-spey cast. It is safer for the tip.
I grant that comment allbeit there's not much difference, save for the 'cut,' between the two.:thumbsup: Part that's a bit odd is most 'right handers' find a 'river right' flow (waters coming from your left to your right) they can do almost any cast with relative ease. For some odd reason the snap T, river right, is as clumsy as it can get for me.

River left and I can pop them right out without blinking.

Go figure?
:confused:
 

runningfish

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Strangely, I only became aware of the snap Tip "danger" until I read something about it. I feel that the more you think about it the more possibility for the fly to hit the tip.
 

fredaevans

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Strangely, I only became aware of the snap Tip "danger" until I read something about it. I feel that the more you think about it the more possibility for the fly to hit the tip.
Ergo my post above. Most 'Newbies' are not aware of the 'inherent danger' built into the cast which is why I mentioned the big loop above."Function follows form" sort of thing. If the loop coming up off the water is fairly exaggerated the line/fly is kept well away from the rod tip.

fae
 

coastrider

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After any spey cast one should always get into the habit of lowering the rod tip to avoid any possible collision

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fyshstykr

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Be careful with this one as its also know as the 'Snapped tip cast.' :eek: When you come around to cut under make that 'loop' with your rod tip BIG! That will keep the fly away from your rod tip.

Fred

First I've heard of this happening, though I can totally see how it could happen if the caster were to apply power in a straight line parallel to the water and then not stop and drop the tip quickly enough, and/or, going back forward with the tip instead of dropping it quickly.

I've gotten in the habit of slowly lifting most of my shootinghead from the water after the dangle, and then when my rod tip is centered with my body(or slightly upstream) I'll quickly & sharply drop my rod tip down to waist level.
 
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eastfly66

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Most 'Newbies' are not aware of the 'inherent danger' built into the cast which is why I mentioned the big loop
That would be me Fred, I was lucky this time , it was only a small un weighted bugger!

Now I make a big fat loop !
 

coastrider

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You can easily break a rod with a dry fly on a single handed rod, spey rods develop such great speed in comparison that just a hook is all that is required to fracture a rod. Once the graphite is fractured, it could take either a cast or a few fish to finish it off. Most harm can be avoided by slowing down and lowering the tip after the cast. Best of luck and just have fun. I can spend all day on the river casting without a fish and still have a blast. Trick is, find a rod that suites your style and therefore becomes an extension of your body. Cheers

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Bigfly

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Fysh, that fine gentleman snapping that T, passed away this year.
Ran the 5 miles back from the take-out.
Clients found him in his truck, dead from a heart attack.
We are all here for a short while.
Make a good cast......

Jim
 
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fyshstykr

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I just recently heard about his passing, he seemed like a good man who certainly had to ability to teach people. That young, and dies from a heart attack.
 

troutclout11

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When i attempt a Snap-T á la Bill Lowe (may he rest in peace), the head of the line lands first followed by the leader, in a sloppy, slack-ridden mess, rather than in a nice and even, uniform lay-down. Obviously this is not ideal for the cast. I'm lifting the rod tip then sweeping around in the D motion, like the video says. Maybe I have to accelerate through the "D" more, and really "snap" it? Maybe I was doing it too gingerly. Anyone else ever have this problem when learning?
 

fyshstykr

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Is this happening on your set up? Such as when you actually make the Snap-T move?

Or is this happening on your forward cast?

Tell us more about your line and leader set up?
 

troutclout11

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Is this happening on your set up? Such as when you actually make the Snap-T move?

Or is this happening on your forward cast?

Tell us more about your line and leader set up?
Sorry about that, I realize now that that was vague. This is happening on the set-up. (I think I've rectified my actual cast piling up by following Fred Evans's advice to aim/shoot high on the forward cast and keep the elbows up). My snap-T itself is sort of piling in front of me, rather than landing evenly and uniformly parallel to the ground.

I am using 370 grain Switch Chucker, looped to a 12' Versileader (5.6 ips), with a short 3' leader made of fluorocarbon 20# test mono.
 

fyshstykr

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When doing the set up for the Snap T motion it should be a straight line movement with your head/leader following behind. You need to lift most of the head to the surface before starting the set up and going into the Snap T motion.

It sounds to me that you do lack a bit of power, and by saying that I'm not meaning to apply more power, I think not having your head on or above the surface of the water is stealing the needed power for a proper set up.

Try this next time your out. At the end of your cast(dangle down) keep your rod pointed down stream and lift your rod tip 6'-7'+- above the waters surface until most of your head has cleared....as soon as you reach that point with your rod tip staying almost parallel sweep back to your stopping point and make your downward movement known as the Snap T.

Note**Once you get the head moving for the set up do not stop, slow down, or change speed until you make your Snap T movement.**

The downward Snap T movement should not be straight down, but rather have a slight forward motion(downstream) angling down to the surface of the water.
 

troutclout11

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Great, thanks for the advice. I actually haven't tried it on the water yet, only on grass and in the snow. Maybe the lack of friction from not being on the water makes it more difficult. I definitely feel that casting will be easier once on the water as it will provide more resistance to load the rod than grass and snow.
 

fyshstykr

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Great, thanks for the advice. I actually haven't tried it on the water yet, only on grass and in the snow. Maybe the lack of friction from not being on the water makes it more difficult. I definitely feel that casting will be easier once on the water as it will provide more resistance to load the rod than grass and snow.
Uhhh, yea, grass/snow casting is certainly part of the problem. That's good to know.
Make yourself about a 15' grass leader and it'll help somewhat.
 
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ia_trouter

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Things were obviously not going well at all so I decided to take it back to the beginning. I have a few short videos I will add later tonight photo bucket permitting. Here is my version of a rollcast. I had way too heavy of a test fly on it at first but I adjusted and got it to rollout pretty decent. Going to take baby steps so this is 27ft Skagit line+10ft sinking leader and 5ft of mono tippet. This is with the Skagit line out the tip and no more. Photobucket vid doesn't work and I tried a couple different ways. I am emailing the switch cast/single spey? and Snap-T vids to a couple guys for help. Not an emergency. Thanks.
 
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