The 'Snap-T' Cast

ia_trouter

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John mentioned the Perry Poke and it is definitely on the near term list. I ran across an excellent Spey Nation video today. It's in a logical progressive order so I don't have to grasp a bunch of basic spey concepts for one cast. While I am sure The Snap-T isn't rocket science, I have proven you have at least a half dozen chances to screw it up. Today was much better. I have something that looks like a Snap-T. Plus a little blood and some snakes during the vid session. :)
 

runningfish

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Like Dewayne said, there are half a dozen ways to blow a snap T for beginner like us. I won't fuss about it and try to find what works for me.

There are some good reasons why beginner like me should learn with longer head. However, Perry Poke is my go to setup for short skagit head, the shorter the head, the closer the anchor and I am trying to keep the fly in front of me.
 

ia_trouter

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Hans,

I have had a lot of hobbies over the years but bar none the spey has been the most mysterious. There is agreement on practically nothing spey. Much more so than single handed casting. The terminology is vague and misused at times. There are moments I wonder if spey caster's will confirm the sun actually rises in the east. :)

It's been a real challenge and will continue to be, but I enjoy it and will get it figured out. I have found a couple youtube sources where the guidance is clear enough to follow a path. Double spey cast is up next.
 

Ard

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Perry Poke is my go to setup for short skagit head, the shorter the head, the closer the anchor and I am trying to keep the fly in front of me.
I could be wrong but I never want the fly in front of me. If it is positioned safely off to either side there is zero chance of it jumping up and coming towards me.

As far as this style of fishing being mysterious I believe we allow ourselves to get sucked into that mindset. Intimidating possibly but for me the intimidation came from such a huge rod. How would I ever handle such a giant? I won't tell you guys that there were no struggles, that there weren't days where I was wondering but it comes down to practicing and understanding the concept.

Sometimes reading a description of how to cast can turn to garble in your head. Watching a video may be helpful but rather than watching the entire screen it may help to focus on certain aspects of the cast. I was able to take a fellow from being a poor caster (single hand) to being proficient in under 15 minutes last year. I did it by making him focus on different parts of what I was doing during each demonstration cast. If the men stood back and watched a guy throw a perfect cast he would see the entire thing. All together, a series of motions and then a line sailing out. By getting him to focus on my left hand he was finally able to see & understand what that hand was doing that was so important to the cast. Once I had him zeroed in on the hand I gave audio so he quickly connected the motions to what was happening elsewhere in the cast. We moved from a view of the whole cast to isolating on what I thought were important parts ie; the hand - the wrist - forearm - shoulder and then on to the rod itself. He then applied what he had just seen and put a fly approximately 50 feet out into the river. Prior to that he was a 25 foot caster with considerable effort in it as well.

I guess I'm trying to say that you have to think about how each step, each motion your hands - arms and body are exerting the energy to the cast. Fly placement and anchor are duly important but your having a clear thought process and relating movements to results seems important to me.

Also, don't get caught up in distance right out of the box. Yes it is important but when learning it is far from critical. You do need to have a working length of line out the rod tip but leave it at that until you find the head ripping at the rod and wanting more line to be shot into the cast. Once you have a good short snap T you will be able to expand the range quite easily.
 

runningfish

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I could be wrong but I never want the fly in front of me. If it is positioned safely off to either side there is zero chance of it jumping up and coming towards me.
Thanks Ard, of course the fly will be not literally smack right in front of me. But thank you for pointing it out.
 

Unknownflyman

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I try to do the perry poke to circle Spey just like Ed Ward does it, so tight and it is safe whatever that means, youre still pulliing into the D and throwing the same way, the perry poke loads the rod without the big circle rip.

I might be a bit confused but the last snap T video looks exactly like the circle Spey.
 

runningfish

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I watched that video for maybe a dozen times. His casting is very relax and smooth. To be honest, I don't have the discipline to keep my elbow from not raising like him. So with a short skagit head, I try to keep my sweep ascending in low angle so I can afford to lift my elbow a bit before the forward cast.

Perry Poke VS Snap T, I'd prefer Perry Poke. With my novice casting skill; I have less control with Snap T. My anchor and my fly positions can be every where. However, with Perry Poke I can place them exactly where I want them to be. In my youtube video, I Perry Poked and placed the anchor and the fly in front of me and to my right at the right distance. And make a wider Perry Poke when I want to cast a bit upstream. Notice that I dragged the head in close and the fly never out of the water until the moment of casting. This way I get to fish the fly closer. Anyway, that is how I do it, doesn't mean I am right thou.
 

Unknownflyman

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You can't see it but the fly is not right in front of him, it's downriver, the line is basically dumped upriver, he lets it set and it moves in the current a bit and the pulling back downriver loads the rod to make the throw.


I'm a right hand upper grip caster so if upriver is off my left, I lift and dump upriver but the fly is still past me down River.


It works good from the dangle in my strong side which is the right down River, I raise high and slow like Dec Hogan instructs and dump at a 45 upriver and then let it set, look where I want to hit and then make the cast like Ed.

I don't have to circle Spey all day then, I use the current to make the T, I just free the line up and dump out in front of me a ways out.

In no way is that fly close to me, it's at a place where it would be if C-Spey 'd it.


My comment about the relative safety is the fact that I performed a circle Spey to set up the cast things looked good, made the rip and still ended up with a 3/0 deciever stuck in my shoulder blade. I made a bad throw, so safe is a relative term to me, things can still go wrong.

I have a hard time with the terminology of spey I learned it as the circle Spey is just the set up of the line in a long T right in front of me a rod length out or a little less actually.

The rip and the throw. Three parts to the cast.

So in this case it would be raise high perry poke as the set up

Rip and throw. Three parts only the beginning is different.
 
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Rabid Rider

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I'm sure it's fine, never done it but am looking into getting rigged up to try.. Just saying that tight little snap to set up for the throw looks like it would be rough on a super fast action rod. But a fast action may be better for such a move. I don't know... All new to me.;)
 
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