The Three Most Common Casting Mistakes

kevind62

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I used to consider myself a rookie and novice. After 7 short years of practice I would now say I am a high level expert or lower level master. I have perfected all of the above flaws to the point I can perform each of them with my eyes closed and without effort or thought. :D
 

mcnerney

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I used to consider myself a rookie and novice. After 7 short years of practice I would now say I am a high level expert or lower level master. I have perfected all of the above flaws to the point I can perform each of them with my eyes closed and without effort or thought. :D
Kevin: I can confirm everything you said, but somehow you seem to catch lots of fish, keep doing what you do, it works! LOL!
Of course you know I'm kidding!
 

brokeoff

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Wait! I thought it was supposed to be a gradual acceleration to a stop?!?!
 

patrick62

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It's amusing to see someone who is good trying to make bad casts for educational purposes. The point is made but I've seen some much more egregious examples. (Not by me of course.)

When I'm teaching a newcomer I find the number one problem is too many false casts, closely followed by the related too much line flopping around problem. Call them 1 and 1a.

Number two, which the video touches on, is force. My guys don't put enough into it, pure and simple. I think they are afraid of breaking the rod. I really have to drill them hard on this one.
 

LOC

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Semantics, fly casting and Ah ha!

So I've had trouble with creep and the tailing loop but probably not what your think.
To clarify, I've had trouble using creep and purposely trying to make a tailing loop.

So before watching this video I could creep the rod forward during a back cast but I failed to form the tailing loop. After watching and listening to his explanation it became clear it's a combo of creep and then a uneven application of the power to the forward cast that causes the tailing loop not just creep.

I can now creep and tail on command very easily. : ]

I found the same issue when I learned how to make a curve cast. In my mind and how I first approached it was trying to make a smooth round curve cast. To make a long story short now that I can make one. If I were to describe what I am doing. I would identify it more as a hook, hinge or even a shock cast.

Last example. I have never seen a video of someone explaining how to throw a pointed loop vs a narrow one. I came across one recently of Steve Rajeff. This is where I think fly casting instruction is really, really tough. Trying to convey tiny complex movements vs how someone else will comprehend them. I could throw a pointed loop before watching this video so I had something to compare his instruction to what I feel I am doing to perform the same task. In a nut shell, I don't feel I'm doing what he says I'm doing even though I must be doing it. lol
 
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randyflycaster

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Pulling the elbow back. This lowers the rod tip during the back cast, and then again on the forward cast. The elbow does move back and forth but mostly because of body rotation. (I cast in the style of Joan Wulff and Steve Rajeff, not Lefty Kreh.)

Having the casting elbow point too far outward. This will also cause the rod tip to lower during the forward cast. I like to keep my elbow pointed at the target.

Randy
 

silver creek

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Semantics, fly casting and Ah ha!

So I've had trouble with creep and the tailing loop but probably not what your think.
To clarify, I've had trouble using creep and purposely trying to make a tailing loop.

So before watching this video I could creep the rod forward during a back cast but I failed to form the tailing loop. After watching and listening to his explanation it became clear it's a combo of creep and then a uneven application of the power to the forward cast that causes the tailing loop not just creep.

I can now creep and tail on command very easily. : ]
For those who have not heard of "creep and jab" causing a tailing loop, I was introduced to this term in an article by Jim McLennan in Fly Fisherman Magazine. The "jab" is the early acceleration really due to creeping after the stop on the back cast. This shortens the stroke length for the following forward cast and that result in the tailing loo

Jim McLennan writes, "Here’s how it works: After the backcast, there is supposed to be a pause while the line straightens out behind the caster. During this pause the rod hand should not move forward. However, many casters begin to slowly creep the rod hand ahead while waiting for the backcast to straighten. When the line becomes straight, there isn’t enough space left between the start and stop positions to make a proper forward cast."



Somewhat related to rod "creep" is rod "drift. Drift is the opposite of Creep. Whereas creep shortens the potential rod stroke length, drift lengthens it and allows the caster to make longer casts.

Drift is the movement of the fly rod tip TOWARD the direction of the preceding cast. Note that creep and drift are in opposite directions. Creep is in the direction of the next cast and drift is in the direction of the preceding cast. So drift INCREASES the available rod stroke distance of the next cast.

There are two ways to drift a fly rod. One is to maintain the same rod angle and to move the casting hand in the direction of the last cast. This is called "translation" and the most common way to drift the rod. The other way is to angle the fly rod so the rod tip moves toward the direction of the previous cast. This is called "rotation." Expert fly casters drift using both techniques of translation and rotation. The technique of angular drifting is most obvious when you see Lefty Kreh cast.

Note that just as there are two ways to drift a fly rod as shown below, translation and rotation are also ways to CREEP a rod. Besides the two illustrations of rod drift below, reexamine that illustration of rod creep above and you will see that there has been both translation and rotational rod creep.




Last example. I have never seen a video of someone explaining how to throw a pointed loop vs a narrow one. I came across one recently of Steve Rajeff. This is where I think fly casting instruction is really, really tough. Trying to convey tiny complex movements vs how someone else will comprehend them. I could throw a pointed loop before watching this video so I had something to compare his instruction to what I feel I am doing to perform the same task. In a nut shell, I don't feel I'm doing what he says I'm doing even though I must be doing it. lol
The video of Rajeff explaining the "V" shaped loop is at 4:09 in the video below during his presentation to the FFI Masters Instructors.

YouTube
 

coug

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Lot's of good stuff here, but the first three things that came to mind when I saw the title "three most common casting mistakes" are
1. too much to drink
2. trying to teach yourself from the internet, you should get a mentor
3. overthinking rather than having fun, so you get frustrated.
 

silver creek

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Lot's of good stuff here, but the first three things that came to mind when I saw the title "three most common casting mistakes" are
1. too much to drink
2. trying to teach yourself from the internet, you should get a mentor
3. overthinking rather than having fun, so you get frustrated.

1. Choosing the wrong actor.
2. Paying too much for the actor.
3. Using Harvey Weinstein as your producer.

 

LOC

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For those who have not heard of "creep and jab" causing a tailing loop, I was introduced to this term in an article by Jim McLennan in Fly Fisherman Magazine. The "jab" is the early acceleration really due to creeping after the stop on the back cast. This shortens the stroke length for the following forward cast and that result in the tailing loo

Jim McLennan writes, "Here’s how it works: After the backcast, there is supposed to be a pause while the line straightens out behind the caster. During this pause the rod hand should not move forward. However, many casters begin to slowly creep the rod hand ahead while waiting for the backcast to straighten. When the line becomes straight, there isn’t enough space left between the start and stop positions to make a proper forward cast."



Somewhat related to rod "creep" is rod "drift. Drift is the opposite of Creep. Whereas creep shortens the potential rod stroke length, drift lengthens it and allows the caster to make longer casts.

Drift is the movement of the fly rod tip TOWARD the direction of the preceding cast. Note that creep and drift are in opposite directions. Creep is in the direction of the next cast and drift is in the direction of the preceding cast. So drift INCREASES the available rod stroke distance of the next cast.

There are two ways to drift a fly rod. One is to maintain the same rod angle and to move the casting hand in the direction of the last cast. This is called "translation" and the most common way to drift the rod. The other way is to angle the fly rod so the rod tip moves toward the direction of the previous cast. This is called "rotation." Expert fly casters drift using both techniques of translation and rotation. The technique of angular drifting is most obvious when you see Lefty Kreh cast.

Note that just as there are two ways to drift a fly rod as shown below, translation and rotation are also ways to CREEP a rod. Besides the two illustrations of rod drift below, reexamine that illustration of rod creep above and you will see that there has been both translation and rotational rod creep.






The video of Rajeff explaining the "V" shaped loop is at 4:09 in the video below during his presentation to the FFI Masters Instructors.

YouTube

Silver thanks for the info...
Yes, it's a lot clearer to me and most likely a student to describe the tailing loop formed by creep as creep and jab.

Steve's discussion at Long Beach club on a pointed loop differs from the one I watched he did at a fly shop. He talks more here about the rotation during the cast which makes more sense to me. The video I watched he talks briefly about finishing the cast to form the pointed loop. All very interesting.
 

Hirdy

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  1. A casting arc that's too wide (a subset of not adjusting the casting arc appropriately).
  2. Using too much power throughout
  3. Failing to separate the lift from the cast.
 

Bigfly

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I used to consider myself a rookie and novice. After 7 short years of practice I would now say I am a high level expert or lower level master. I have perfected all of the above flaws to the point I can perform each of them with my eyes closed and without effort or thought. :D
So Kev, now we work on our drift. Should be good after a short 14 years.....since the drift is 2x harder than the cast!!! HA!


And no snap involved (ever) in the cast....it's an exponential increase in speed to a stop. Smooth is best, not snappy.

Jim
 
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Bigfly

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I know it's not one of the 3 probs.....
But someone mentioned false casting. How many of you go on three?
Two false casts and then a boomer is what I see a lot.
Your first two casts were fine, then ya add some to the last cast......overpowering the cast is common.
When I watch old films of Brits casting, they go on cast 5 or 6
No reason to wave the rod around here, put that fly down.
Learn to go on one cast only. You won't scare so many fish.
Pick it up and put it down.......

Jim
 

patrick62

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^ Three is a lot for me. I see a lot of what seems to me to be completely unnecessary false casting. Usually winding up with too much line flopping around and not much control. But who am I to be critical.
 

boisker

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Unless you are slipping line or making a big angle change then any further false casts are just wasting time:)
 
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