Thoughts on using protectant on floating lines

Ard

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I just use them, if they become dirty and begin to not float high and lift easy I wipe the line by drawing through paper towel. That removes most grime, then I use the Loon Products line dressing kit that I've had nearly 10 years. The kit is pretty good and obviously lasts for years. I did run out of Loon Glide and am using a Rio product now. I don't know what 303 is....
 

flytie09

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Seems unnecessary to me. I apply a line cleaner (Rio Agent X or equivalent) with a cloth pad before every trip on my trout lines.

I guess I should wash them once a year in soapy water.... but don’t.

I would advise against using a paper towel in the cleaning process as there are abrasive fillers that are used in them that will damage a fly lines exterior. Cotton is the way to go.

My personal opinion of course.
 

silver creek

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I just invested a C-Note on a Rio "In Touch" Gold line. Which I applied some 303 protectant on it ( the first 10 feet). Seemed like a good idea. Dunno. What thoughts do you have on protecting floating lines?
Do NOT use automotive products like Armorall or 303 Protectant on fly lines!

Rio used to have this warning on it's web site ""We strongly suggest not using the many automotive products that are recommended for cleaning fly lines. These products have chemicals in that will certainly de-plasticize the fly line, leaving it dry and cracked over time. Use a cleaning agent manufactured and sold by a fly line company."

It is still on this link:

Cleaning Fly Lines | Rio Fly Line Cleaning Products - Minturn Anglers


Interview with Simon Gawesworth from Rio Products on Sexyloops:

“How best to treat Rio Lines? What do you personally use (silicone spray? Armorall?)

"Never, ever use Armorall on a PVC fly line. It breaks down the bond and results in very poor durability. The line will dry out and harden with constant use of Armorall. We recommend a mild soapy water with a flannel to clean the line, then if you want to re-lubricate it, apply a 100% silicone, though very lightly. All PVC fly lines use silicone as a lubricant, so it is best to use the base ingredient to prolong the line's life."


Manufacturers Section
 

myt1

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I have an aresol can of silicone lubricant in the garage.

Is this the type of silicone you mean?
 

osseous

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303 is NOT the same as Armor All. 303 is safe for PVC. It is an excellent UV inhibitor and keeps the material supple. Armor All is the stuff you want to avoid.

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triggw

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It's easy. If you drop a C-Note on a line, do whatever the manufacturer recommends, and don't do anything they don't recommend.
 

ixoye

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I wash my lines in soapy water and polish them with Tiemco line-dressing when they get dirty, then they become as new again.
 

sweetandsalt

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Really just mild soap diluted in warm water and a clean soft cloth is all that is required. You do not want to use products that accelerate the migration of imbedded plasticizers. I like to hook my fly to a flexy tree branch, strip my line off my reel as I walk across a meadow and lean the rod against another branch, walk a wet lightly soaped up rag back and forth a couple of times then repeat with a clean just water weted cloth and finally a dry cloth. Sit down in camp, sip my pre dinner whisky then get my butt up and reel the line back on...nice and evenly level wound thank you. Yes, I do carry in my kit some of that RIO line cleaner but only occasionally, if things are really ichy do I use it. Do not use a lot of pressure or anything even a little abrasive. The chemistry of modern PVC lines is intended to be fine as is without additives on their surfaces. It happens I fish very dirty, organically fecund rivers like the Henry's Fork and Missouri and lines work best when clean.
 

falcon53

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I too use warm water and mild soap (Dawn) to clean both my fly lines and glass lens sunglasses. Once in a while I treat them with Umpqua Glide Line Dressing usually when I am at home on a cold or rainy day.

I also use the multiple bucket method described on Rio's website
 

jdwy

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303 is NOT the same as Armor All. 303 is safe for PVC. It is an excellent UV inhibitor and keeps the material supple. Armor All is the stuff you want to avoid.
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I've used 303 for years on most anything I wanted UV/sun fading protection from, but I sure wouldn't take a chance using it on my fly lines since they say don't even get Deet and sunscreen on them. I use SA's line cleaner/dressing on all my lines and that's it. As far as Armorall, decades ago when auto interiors had plastic covered dashes, etc, a couple auto upholstery shop guys told me they loved Amorall. Gave them lots of business because they were convinced it caused all types of trim to crack over time. I figured if anyone would know, they should.
 

osseous

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303 is recommended for PVC and urethane. It is excellent for flylines.

You put your faith in an auto detailer. I will trust my wife- a polymer chemist with 8 patents.

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jdwy

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Beg to differ, these were auto UPHOLSTERY REPAIR shop owners, not detailers. Plus as I posted, I was referring to their experience strictly with Armorall, not 303 Protectant.
 
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osseous

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Beg to differ, these were auto UPHOLSTERY REPAIR shop owners, not detailers. Plus as I posted, I was referring to their experience strictly with Armorall, not 303 Protectant.
You lumped it in with deet and sunscreen- why, I have no idea. Then went in two different directions on Armor All, so I'm not sure what point you are trying to make. I'm still trying to figure out what car seats have to do with fly lines...

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flytie09

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Well...I did a little digging about the 303 Aerospace Protectant. I honestly had never heard about it before. It is used by many anglers to clean and recondition their fly lines. I'm honestly quite surprised. It does get high marks for UV protection and is noted to be super slick.... which is good for fly lines. Orvis apparently sells the product rebranded as Super Slick Line Dressing - Fly Line Dressing - Orvis. Reviews are pretty sparkly from what I can read. So there you have it.

But I've read feedback from a few users that stated that it actually made the line lose bouyancy and cause it to start to sink. I would be curious if anyone else has noted this side effect. This would be a real detractor to me if true.....what say you?

I personally use Rio's AgentX line dressing (conditioner). I'm not a polymer chemist PhD, but I trust that Rio does...and if they sell it for their lines.....it's what I want to use. Plus it works great.

From Rio - This month’s Featured Product is RIO’s AgentX Line Cleaning Kit | Facebook

This month’s Featured Product is RIO’s AgentX Line Cleaning Kit
October 29, 2010 at 11:39 AM
General Modern fly lines are so much more superior than their older counterparts. Advances in chemistry and technology have made lines more durable, higher floating, slicker, smoother and even more dirt-repellant. Despite this, fly lines should be cleaned regularly.

Intro Cleaning a fly line keeps it slick and dirt free, meaning longer distances and less tangles. It also makes a fly line last a lot longer! The RIO team recommends three steps to cleaning a fly line – depending on how often it is used.

Step 1 After almost every outing the fly line should be wiped down with a soft, damp cloth – just once is fine. The best way of doing this is to strip the line off the reel and then wind it back on, running the fly line through the wet cloth as it is being wound. Fast, efficient and effective.

If fishing in salt, or if standing on the shore of a lake/river, or in a boat when the coils pick up excess dirt, it is better to pull the fly line off the reel and place the coils in a sink filled with warm water and a mild detergent. Run the fly line through a soft cloth a couple of times (while still in the sink), then wipe the line down through a separate cloth that is wet with freshwater (not soapy), before winding it back on to the reel.

Step 2 After every 3rd to 4th outing, it is better to rub the fly line down with a micro abrasive cloth, before going through step 1. Fly lines have pores and these pores can clog with dirt and muck that is hard to get out with a soft cloth. A micro abrasive cloth digs out the dirt in the pores. It also reinvigorates the plastic coating of the fly line, and re-awakens the self-lubricating properties that are part of the chemistry. Don’t use emery or glass paper as these are too course and can damage the fly line. Instead, use one of the purpose designed ones such as RIO’s Wonder Cloth for such work. One advantage of the Wonder Cloth is that you can throw it in the washing machine once it gets dirty and wash it clean – reusing it time and time again.

Step 3 The final step in cleaning a fly line is to apply a conditioning agent after every 5th or 6th outing. It is worth doing this just to keep your fly line at the very peak of performance. After following step 2 apply a thin coating of a fly line conditioner (such as RIO’s Agent X line dressing) to the fly line and leave it to dry for about 30 minutes. To do this, strip the fly line off the reel and into the bottom of a large, clean cardboard box. (you can use the floor if it is hardwood and freshly cleaned, but never on to a carpet floor, concrete or other floor that might have dirt and dust on). We recommend applying the coating with a clean cloth, and highly recommend RIO’s Wonder Cloth for application. Once the fly line has been left to dry for at least half an hour, buff the line down a couple of times with a clean, dry, soft cloth.

Product For anyone that cleans fly lines, a very useful item is RIO’s AgentX Line Cleaning Kit. This little package contains a 1oz bottle of AgentX Fly Line Dressing and 2 Wonder Cloths – everything an angler needs to keep their fly lines in top condition.

Warning The AgentX line dressing contains silicon (among numerous other chemicals) which helps both the slickness and the buoyancy of a fly line. While this is great on floating lines, do not apply on slow sinking, or intermediate lines, as you could find these lines floating for a short while after initial application!


Poppy from the Red Shed actually recommends a different product for Airflo lines:

"For Airflo flylines, Airflo's Turbo Shoot is very good. I like to call it "El Slicko". STP's "Son of a Gun" protectant also works well on Airflo lines. I like Rio's Agent X on lines other then Airflo"

The composition of the fly line very much dictates what you can or should use to recondition it.

Wash it in a mild detergent like Ivory soap, use a soft cloth to wipe clean, let it dry. Apply an appropriate conditioner. Buff clean with a clean dry soft cloth.

Again......my method of applying it in the field and not cleaning the line completely first is much to be desired. Don't do what I do applies.......

All of this sciencey stuff makes my head hurt.
 

losthwy

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Orvis apparently sells the product rebranded as Super Slick Line Dressing - Fly Line Dressing - Orvis. Reviews are pretty sparkly from what I can read. So there you have it.
I found the same about Orvis using it. Generally the info is spotty. I also found NRS rafts recommends it for their (PVC) rafts. I do like the UV protection and have used it on all of my PVC and plastic gear. Including my PVC inflatable kayak. So far so good.
 

osseous

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It is important to wipe off the excess 303- says so on their packaging. Perhaps that's linked to the sinking reports? It's not a floating agent.

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jdwy

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You lumped it in with deet and sunscreen- why, I have no idea. Then went in two different directions on Armor All, so I'm not sure what point you are trying to make. I'm still trying to figure out what car seats have to do with fly lines...Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Let me try and spell it out, if shop owners in the upholstery business said Armorall caused dashboards and other interior trim to crack, discolor, and deteriorate prematurely, there's a remote possibility it might not be the ideal substance to apply to a somewhat more delicate and more cared for item such as a fly line, right? Especially since the makers of said fly lines make reasonably priced cleaners and treatments designed specifically for their products.
I personally use Rio's AgentX line dressing (conditioner). I'm not a polymer chemist PhD, but I trust that Rio does...and if they sell it for their lines.....it's what I want to use. Plus it works great.
Yessir, I use SA's dressing, not often enough, probably the same stuff.
 

sweetandsalt

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At home I use the bath tub instead of a sink...it is bigger. And, I'll have to check with RIO, but I just use a kitchen microfiber cloth.
 

jdwy

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Last time I used the bucket to bucket method I ended up with a worse nest-ball in my line than I ever got in my leader following a vicious tailing loop. :)
 
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