Trespassing

sjkirkpa

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Scott,

I don't know where you are in Michigan, but Michigan (maybe other states, too, I don't know) has a ton of Commercial Forest Reserve (CFR) land. Up here in the UP, it's actually amazing how much land is designated as CFR. CFR land is open for recreational use (with some restrictions, like no overnight camping, no atvs, etc), even though it it typically owned by a forestry company or private citizen. You should look at maps of CFR land and see if the piece of land you want to cross is designated as such. If so, then you are good and you are not trespassing. There is also a surprising amount of state and federal land that is not openly marked as such.

Of course, the further north you go, the more of all of these types of lands are available. In the UP, there is probably more accessible land than private.

Look here for a map of your area: https://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-350-79119_79147_81529-200319--,00.html
 
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dharkin

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The hunting app that I use (Huntstand) has a "property info" feature that is derived from the Registry of Deeds. Simply click on the land parcel that you are curious about, and it will tell you the land owner. Here is a random parcel from the app that shows state land in Rhode Island and another property in Montana that has a private owner.Parcel.PNGMontana.PNG
 
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bigjim5589

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I know that MD had laws for access to rivers & streams, that for the most part, it was considered that the state owned the river/stream bottom and in some cases defined to the normal high or low water point. However, there was also some King's Grant property, and the state still considered that legal and courts upheld challenges. That meant the rivers or stream thru that property was not state property so if you were wading or even in a watercraft, you could still be trespassing.

I've read some comments from folks here who were discussing marsh access, for fishing & hunting and there's similar laws here to what MD had, but also these King's Grant properties. So, it's not always a given that navigational waters are going to be public.

Again, it's best to do some research and make sure before you go to an area that is not well defined as public or private property.
 

Hayden Creek

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I'm back on a public seasonal road, at one point the river comes within 30 yards. No trespassing signs to be seen. Legal to cross that land and get to the river?

How about an unmarked two track that's not on the county map or GPS, no signs, do you drive it back to the river?

How do you go about unmarked land?

This varies by region I would think, which is why I put it here in Great Lakes area.
I own a decent size ranch surrounded by NF. All fenced and posted.
The real reason for the fence is to keep cattle out that are run on NF property with our tax dollars. The law in CO is fence them out not in. Cows can't read so occasionally tear up the fence and get in.
I've caught hunters on the ranch who you would think can read that have cut my fence to drive through on their atv's.
But... fences don't always mean private property in the NF of CO. Naturally these fences are in very poor shape which is often an indication of their purpose.
But... crossing any fence is a crap shoot. I grew up in south Texas, doing so there could put your health in jeopardy. Here you could easily have a visit with LE if you come across the wrong owner.
Educate or roll the dice.
The guys who cut my fence paid fines and now have a record.
I got my fence repaired and a new truck😊

My favorite no trespassing sign ever I saw in New Mexico.
" No Trespassing. Run out of room to hide the bodies".
 

jjcm

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I do not think that is at all true. This is the law, from what I can find. Private land along rivers often extends to the middle of the river, but federal law confirms a public easement to navigate and walk along the banks. I can't remember the line. But it's a certain distance (in feet) to the high watermark. I'll ask my friends in the DNR tomorrow and find out for sure.
Not sure which post to reply to regarding Michigan's waters, but wanted to share this:

 
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