Water Proofing Flies

gordy5

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It lost all of its "red", and is now a dull, reddish black color. The herl lost all its irridescence, and is also a muddy green.
 

bruce m

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Sounds like what you describe is that the color is actually bleeding out of the thread, not just darkening from getting wet.
I don't know what "Agra" is but when I did soak them in silicon they would darken a little but not much.
I really don't bother doing that much anymore either.

Also, WELCOME TO THE FORUM!!
 

gordy5

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Thanks for the welcome! I will see if I can post some before and after pics, because the effect on the both the herl and the thread is pretty dramatic...but that means I have to tie some new Coachman's first. Oh well . . .:wiggle:
 

fender77

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For CDC flies I use Petitjean CDC oil. It’s awesome! And what I discovered is that you can very well use it on flies with other materials too.

If I fish a hackled fly - let’s say a stimulator, I let the fly get soaked in TMC dry dip super and then gently rub in som cdc oil into the hackle. Not so much that the oil makes the fibers stick together though. It will make the fly float like a cork!
 

ottosmagic13

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I use Gink on the water and some no-name silicone based fabric water proofing spray on the bench.

Spray a little in a old Mason jar drop in some flies and swirl. Remove with forceps and set to dry.

New flies usually float until I catch something and then I'll change. I'll Gink them before using again. If it's my last one or I'm lazy a few false casts will dry it enough for a drift or two.

Some dubbing does get a little darker after treatment but nothing drastic.

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psishapiro

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I use Gink on the water and some no-name silicone based fabric water proofing spray on the bench.

Spray a little in a old Mason jar drop in some flies and swirl. Remove with forceps and set to dry.

New flies usually float until I catch something and then I'll change. I'll Gink them before using again. If it's my last one or I'm lazy a few false casts will dry it enough for a drift or two.

Some dubbing does get a little darker after treatment but nothing drastic.

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Is that a common practice to treat flies before hitting the water? I’m visualizing days or even weeks in advance... if so, is there a ideal timing?


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moucheur2003

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For CDC flies I use Petitjean CDC oil. It’s awesome! And what I discovered is that you can very well use it on flies with other materials too.
There are lots of floatant products out there, some for temporary on-stream use and some purportedly for permanent waterproofing, and as far as I can tell every one has both fans and critics. There are also "home remedy" substitutes out there like Scotchgard or Bergman's formula that seem to get similarly inconsistent reviews. I haven't tried them all, but of the ones I've tried so far I haven't found any that are really permanent for the life of the fly in a once-and-done way.

I am using temporary on-stream products these days. What seems to work best for most flies is a combination of paste or gel floatant like Gink or Aquel or Poo Goo (I'm not particular about the brand) and dessicant powder. I fish my fly until it becomes saturated and starts to sink, then I squeeze it dry with a piece of cloth or drying sponge, then I give it a couple of shakes in a jar of dessicant, then I apply more floatant paste. If you're DIY-inclined, you can make your own jar of dessicant by saving the packets that come in electronics, pills, and other packaging and dumping them into an old 35mm film canister or pill bottle.

However, it's important to remember that CDC flies require a different approach. Unlike other materials, CDC has natural oil infused in its tiny fibers, and using a paste or silicone product gums up the fibers and negates the natural floating qualities of the feathers. If you're treating CDC flies, either use CDC oil to replenish the natural oil (as Fender suggests) or use a fine dry powder like Frog's Fanny.
 

ottosmagic13

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Is that a common practice to treat flies before hitting the water? I’m visualizing days or even weeks in advance... if so, is there a ideal timing?


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It might not be the most common but I got the tip from somewhere on the internet, tried it and it worked well, so it's not unheard of.

I tie my own flies so I tend to treat them after I finish tying a set.

I found that 12 hours is necessary, 24+ ideal. Under 12 hours the flies will leave a film in the water.

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LePetomane

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Rain X and let it dry for 24 hours. On the stream I use Loon Aquel. One application is all I need. The fly will float all day.
 
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