Wf & dt

redietz

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Do you have a rod marked like that? I'd ask the rod maker what they have in mind with those ratings.
I've owned several, and seen hundreds. Again, the only time rods were marked for different tapers was when lines were rated by diameter (letters) and a level line of a given letter weighed more than a DT line with the same middle letter. Once lines started being rated by weight (numbers) taper went out of the equation. A rod marked with several numbers means only that the rod can be reasonably expected to cast lines of those weights. The taper of the line has nothing to do with it.
 

old timer

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Ok, first off I didn't say I agree with what I said about a 4/5 rating. I meant that it's an old myth and what might have been on the mind of the rod maker.

Here's an article by Carlin a well known bamboo maker. Scroll way down and in darker type you see him mention how some thought 4/5 meant DT4wt/WF 5wt.

WF vs DT Fly Lines
 

trev

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Do you have a rod marked like that? I'd ask the rod maker what they have in mind with those ratings.
Yes I have and in it's day the model was very popular. It actually would probably carry a #6 rating today's marketing. The rod designer is deceased, I believe, but if you need to ask him what the markings mean, why bother marking the rod in the first place?

Here's an article by Carlin a well known bamboo maker. Scroll way down and in darker type you see him mention how some thought 4/5 meant DT4wt/WF 5wt.

WF vs DT Fly Lines
As I read that, he says that the idea of 4-5 etc. referring to DT4 and WF5 is a myth, which is what Bob said above.
Honestly, I never before encountered this idea; I'm not old enough to recall the '40s and didn't pick up fishing til I was in my mid twenties, so I don't have any notion of what was said prior to ~1975, but I was told then and have since believed that marking for multiple line weights just meant that the rod wouldn't break if those weights were cast.
I have seen quite a few rods that were totally unmarked, leaving it up to the user to chose and I have seen a few rods that listed many line weights and some by taper, making me conclude that such markings were suggestions rather than requirements.
 
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old timer

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I've always thought a rod has a sweet spot with the right line. I feel a rod should be marked with that line. Of course, we're all different and some of us want to make long casts or have it load in close. So, we make adjustments to how the rod is marked. However, that sweet spot line should be the only line marked on the rod.

Just my .02.
 

trev

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If that were the case they'd also have to mark the rod with the line manufacturer and when that line became discontinued the rod would be thrown away.
My 2c is that rods should just be unmarked and let anglers learn for themselves, instead of fostering a false sense of security that they have the best line for the rod or vice versa.
 

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That's fine for those of us who have a lot of lines and know what to look for. What about the beginner who has no idea what line to put on a rod and only wants to buy one line.

You appear to only be thinking of your own situation and not the general public that rod makers have to deal with.

I've had my say and i'm done with this thread.
 
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