What have you been tying today?

plugs

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Renegade.jpg

This Fore and Aft pattern can be used on both river and lake. In small sizes it can work as a midge cluster pattern and, in larger sizes, it might be considered an attractor pattern. Devised in Idaho on the Malad River by guide Taylor "Beartracks" Williams in 1928, it was an excellent pattern for cutthroat trout. The Renegade can be fished either as a wet fly or dry fly. As a dry fly, the Renegade can be cast upstream towards feeding trout. The Double Hackles provide excellent floatation and visibility. Another method is to cast across and slightly upstream, letting the fly float downstream. Once the fly is below you, pull it upstream as a wet pattern. Choice of hackle materials will determine whether the pattern is primarily a wet fly or dry fly. You can use the stiffer Whiting Rooster Saddles for excellent floatation as a dry pattern or use Hen Saddles for a wet pattern. Either way, they are tied in a collar style. On lakes, the pattern can be a good choice when trout are feeding on chironomid emergers particularly during the early evening , used with a floating line and floro leader.
 

flytire

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plugs

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Kings River Caddis.jpg

Wayne "Buz" Buszek created this fly in the 1950's while fishing the Kings River and trying to match the caddis fly hatch that was taking place below Pine Flat Reservoir. . The success of the fly became well known during the 1960's when Orvis included it in their catalog and many flyfishing books began to mention it. Buz maintained a flyfishing store in Visalia, CA. The Federation of Fly Fishers honored Buz by creating the Buz Buszek Memorial Award in 1970 which is awarded annually to an outstanding fly tyer demonstrating skill, innovation, and the sharing of knowledge in the art of fly tying.
 

plugs

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Leadwing Coachman.jpg

The Leadwing Coachman finds it's origins in the early 1820's as an offering from a carriage driver, Tom Bosworth, to his English Lord for fishing. The original Coachman fly was a wet pattern of a peacock herl body, white duck quill wing, and brown throat hackle. Although wet flies found much interest during the early 1900's, they seem to have lost favor with most flyfishermen. The Leadwing Coachman can still be an effective fly, today.
 

flytire

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Cicada

Hook - Mustad R74-9672, size 8
Thread - Black
Overbody - Black foam
Ribbing - Orange uni stretch, multiple strands twisted
Body - Black dubbing brush
Legs - Black/orange rubber legs
Wing - Cream antron fibers
Painted orange eyes

I don't think they'll be in my area but the bluegills should be all over this thing 😃
 
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