What Would You Tell Your Younger Self About Fly Fishing?

Meuniere

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Since I started early, I guess I'd have to say "keep at it" and not to let other things get in the way. One of the best means of making this happen is to be involved with other people who do the same thing, regardless of wherever anyone may be on the learning curve, because it never ends. If self-motivation was all it took, we'd all be wallowing in something- but there is nothing as energizing as helping others learn, and learning from others. I didn't know that, for a long time.
 

silver creek

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Learn to cast and mend WELL.

If you cannot place the fly, leader and line where it is needed for success, you will not succeed.

I have found fly fishers who have fished for years who do not know how to make aerial mends and place the fly accurately. So although they use the right fly, in the right size, and know how to read the water, etc, etc; they fail at presenting the fly.
 
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mjm6

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  • Backpack to those alpine lakes and remote streams when you can while you can. What they say about the legs going first is true.
  • There are more flyfishing adventures than trout and smallies...try salt sooner than later
  • Don't wait until your 6th decade to get to Alaska
My father and I used to hit the high country in the West as often as we could... He's 80 now and still has great mobility, but the trips to the high country are 10 years gone now... I'm trying to meet up with him 2x a year to do some fishing before he loses his ability to wade (we live on opposite sides of the country), so this advice it very good to think about, especially if you enjoy the freezing cold waters and the small but plentiful cuts, brookies, and golden trout in the high country.

My biggest regret and advice to my younger self would have been to recognize the importance of flyfishing to my general well being and make sure that my choice in partner is also a strong outdoors person (and maybe even fisherwoman) so that we can spend all that time on the stream TOGETHER in one form or another. It would have made my 20s and 30s a bit easier to manage and I would have been on the water a lot more.
 

Oregonipa

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I would tell myself that I didn't have to keep and eat every fish that I caught. My mom cooked me a lot of trout when I was young... Along those lines, "crushed barbs are cool", "keep em wet", "reels with a drag are a drag", "don't wait until you're forty to buy wading boots", and "dry shake is the s&%$!"
 

bumble54

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I would tell my younger self?, absolutely nothing, it would spoil the learning process, which was the most satisfying and fun part of it all.
 

Virgin Cork

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My father and I used to hit the high country in the West as often as we could... He's 80 now and still has great mobility, but the trips to the high country are 10 years gone now... I'm trying to meet up with him 2x a year to do some fishing before he loses his ability to wade (we live on opposite sides of the country), so this advice it very good to think about, especially if you enjoy the freezing cold waters and the small but plentiful cuts, brookies, and golden trout in the high country.

My biggest regret and advice to my younger self would have been to recognize the importance of flyfishing to my general well being and make sure that my choice in partner is also a strong outdoors person (and maybe even fisherwoman) so that we can spend all that time on the stream TOGETHER in one form or another. It would have made my 20s and 30s a bit easier to manage and I would have been on the water a lot more.
I'm glad you are able to get out fishing and enjoying the wilds with your father. My Dad is 93 and we still go fly fishing once a week. We are not doing anything heroic anymore, just finding easy access fishing for panfish, smallies and trout. We used to be all about the journey and the quarry, now it is just about sharing those fleeting moments.

My younger self fell head over heels for a woman I have been with 40 years now. Our first date was white-water rafting and we have camped, hiked, travelled and enjoyed our family and business together. She tried the fly fishing and nature photography with me but it never took, just as some of her passions never really interested me. It took some negotiation and adjustment by both of us, but we manage our time so we can both enjoy our separate passions while still enjoying our life together. Falling in love happens, and once you partner up, that part of life becomes a negotiation complete with wins, losses, sacrifices, rewards, joy, heartache and hopefully few regrets...

The list I posted to tell my young self are not viewed by me as regrets, just things I would have whispered in my ear so I could have more years to experience them. I am grateful that I discovered and found time to do those things at some point in my life. Now if I could just go back and convince my young self to buy gold at $32/ounce or Amazon at $8/share!
 

COTater

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  1. The worst day of fly fishing is still better than the best day at work
  2. Enjoy the time on the water & the scenery
  3. Always have your gear with you
  4. Don't buy cheap - buy less expensive
  5. Trophy / beauty is in the eye of the beholder
  6. Relax and have fun!
 
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