Which Fly?

dipaoro

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I was in PA today, Brodhead Creek and the fish were rising but every dry fly thrown ended in no bites.

We could see BWO and we thought March Browns. We tried everything with no luck.

I am going back tomorrow morning and seeking some help with a dry fly.

Was still a nice day and sunny but it would have been better to see a splash and a fish.

Much Appreciated!
 

osseous

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Focus hard on the rising fish and their rise forms. Try to see them take a bug off the surface. If not- Was their tail breaking the surface when they ate? Did they leave a bubble behind=adult. No=emerger or nymph (flashbacks are good here) suspended beneath a dry. Next- be sure you are using light enough tippet. If you cannot get a take- reduce tippet size. Going one size smaller on your fly is often beneficial as well. If your bug is very easy to spot among the naturals, it's too big. In very desperate situations, get above the fish, kneel down if possible- and present the fly downstream so that is the first thing they see.

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Bent Undergrowth

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Agree with everything osseus said.

I'd add that first and foremost you should check your drift. Are you getting any drag? Even micro drag can turn off fish when they're feeding on mayflies.

Are you fishing high-floating dries? Try something that sits lower in the surface film like an RS2.

Also, beware masking hatches. If you keep striking out, you should try to get a sample by seining the water in the same current lane below the fish. I use a pain strainer ($3 home depot) and pull that over my landing net.

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dipaoro

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There were large splashes around us, two of us tried it all. We did not see constant risers. Two other fishermen using bait were struggling as well.

Was a bit frustrating today (not that much for me) but my friend was pissed. We could see a brown/tan looking fly (large) hover in the air which the birds were eating. I did match my dry with the flies floating on the water. I was told to go with BWO #14 and I did. Also was told brown winged... and I tried it.
 

dipaoro

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My drift was fine.... and I know what you mean there. I need to look thru my flies for smaller sizes and do some research.

Anything else?
 

MichaelCPA

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Spinners? What is late in the day?

Emergers: try a soft hackle with floatant in the film? Or swing them (from above the feeding lie) right onto the fish's nose on a floating leader, no weight.
 

dipaoro

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I was fishing from 8am to 3pm. Most action risers around 9 to 11am. Going back from 8am to 11am tomorrow.
 

flytie09

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I preface the fact I've never fished there.....but here is how I would approach it. There are only a handful of hatches listed for this Creek. So this limits your focus.

Brodhead-Hatches.jpg

If you can look up and print the nymph and adult pics for each respective insect...this will help with insect ID. Troutnut is an excellent reference for this.


Pick up rocks and shake some bushes and see whats active. Check your trusty hatch chart / insect ID reference and pick one that matches the size and color and stage as close as possible.

Smart trout that see heavy pressure get line/leader/tippet shy, will refuse certain fly profiles. Keep at it. If you're fishing with someone else....work together. You try a March Brown he / she tries a BWO. Start on the larger side and work down to smaller sizes.

Good luck.
 

Nosesupflyfishing

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Usually when casting dries, the advice is to cast upstream. I’ve found that with picky trout, often times a down and across presentation works best. This allows the fish to see your fly before the line and leader, and minimizes micro drag.
Also, you mentioned brown bugs hovering above the water and splashing rises, I didn’t see them but if I had to guess I would agree with what Dave B said, caddis.
 

ts47

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Caddis have a very erratic flight path - up, down, side to side - as if they are having a hard time figuring out where they want to go. Mayflies fly more in a particular direction/more of a straight line. Caddis can also be as big as a size 12, the same size as a march brown.
 

VaFisherman

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Don't forget to try a midge pupa dropped below your dry fly. Midges are a hatch that is missed by many. Splashy rises are a good sign of emergers and a black or cream colored zebra midge could be the ticket.
 

philly

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Definitely try some caddis patterns. They're fairly common on Eastern PA streams, more so than mayflies. Midges are another possibility
 

trev

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dipaoro

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I did the reading and met a nice guy in the river today. He eventually told me, the water was too turbulent in the spot I was in. There are three large boulders in the spot where the fish hang out. The current swirls a lot. My only chance was to land the fly on the right spot with a soft landing. I did not do it.

Appreciate all of the help.
 

upstreamcast

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Try drag free drifting a size 18 Griffith's Gnat (long leader ending with 6x or even 7x tippet). Best to use a GG that has CDC incorporated in it. It allows the GG to float high up. Treat with Fumed Silica every now and then to keep high float. I can almost guarantee a look see.....maybe even a take.
 
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