Which is your gear choice?

ts47

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My favorite on-water boat or wading camera for years was a Nikon Coolpix P7100 that fit in a small velcro belt pouch. It took great fill-flash stills and video and was easy to pull out and operate with one hand for those action shots. I lost it when a "guide" knocked me off the bow of a skiff with his push pole while bonefishing. Saltwater and non-protected camera gear don't mix well...
Now I use an Iphone 10 which is fairly waterproof for hold and grins, close video, landscapes and shallow underwater shots. Fits in a zippered pocket or in a holster. You can also do some quick inphone editing to play around with color, cropping etc on the spot. Not as good as a 28-70 mm lens but much easier to carry and produces surprisingly good images. I have been toting one of my wildlife rigs on select occasions, a Nikon D810 or D500 with a Nikon 200-500mm lens, in a modified Simms waterproof roll-top dry pack backpack. You never know when some of the local wildlife might appear as you are afield. I always pack along a couple of rain shield cover bags and a backup trash bag just in case of foul weather.

This worked pretty good in the Katmai region, Alaska
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Nikon D500 w/ 200-500mm
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Nikon D500 w/200-500mm in a steady rain
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American Pipit on sockeye carcass. D500 w/200-500mm
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Sockeye on the Kulik River. Iphone 10
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Silver salmon on the Kamishak River. Iphone 10
I forgot to say this earlier, but... Beautiful photos!!
 

PEN|OUT

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I have owned a couple Nikon DSLR's, about a year ago I got a FUJIFILM XT4 and it is light years nicer than any mirrored camera I ever used.

Very happy with it.

I have the 16-55mm lens and the 14mm prime lens.

I'd post some photos, but keep getting an error message when I try to upload.
 
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LePetomane

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I have owned a couple Nikon DSLR's, about a year ago I got a FUJIFILM XT4 and it is light years nicer than any mirrored camera I ever used.
I'd be interested in hearing more about the XT-4. I have an older XT-1 that I still use quite a bit. I use it with a Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 lens. A nice combination.
 

SanDollars

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My rig is a Nikon D850 and in the bag is the Holy Trinity (14-24, 24-70, 70-200mm f2.8) a 50mm f1.4 and finally, a 105mm Macro. It's a lot to drag around......

Lately, if I'm not really feeling it or don't expect exceptional photo ops, I just slap on a 28-300mm and leave the rest.

If I'm REALLY not feeling it I just take the iPhone :)
 

Nonno

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The camera that is usually with me when I'm fishing is a Fuji XP. I like the colour profile of Fujichrome. My other gear is a Nikon D7000, and a Df. The lenses I usually have with me are a 24-85 AF-D, a 105 ai, and the 70-300 AF-S. I have some great manual Nikkors that mate well with my two digital SLR's.
 

hatidua

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I tend toward opposite ends of the spectrum with the amount of photo stuff I carry.

when I'm actually "trying" -

-Canon 5DsR
-15mm fisheye in an Aquatech housing behind an 8" dome.
-16-35
-24-70
-100-400 II
-100mm macro
-tripod or monopod depending on
situation
-about a dozen different ND filters


When I'm more after fish than photos-

Canon S100 in a water housing in a Patagonia fannypack.

The 5DsR allows for significant cropping if necessary and still having a file size adequate for publication, whereas the S100 needs to be used in such a manner that the entire file is retained if going to a full page. Spontaneity certainly favors the S100.
 

Virgin Cork

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My rig is a Nikon D850 and in the bag is the Holy Trinity (14-24, 24-70, 70-200mm f2.8) a 50mm f1.4 and finally, a 105mm Macro. It's a lot to drag around......
Nice bag of glass! You're right, it is a load...
I have had all those lenses, and used to load up a ThinkTank backpack and haul it everywhere. Still do if I'm base camping from home or out of my camper or some other lodging. I evolved away from the 70-200mm f2.8 and 50mm f1.4 due to my subject preferences, and I don't use the 14-24mm as much since I moved back to the Midwest, but love it when I do. The 24-70mm f2.8 has been tried and true for many years, and the 105 Macro is a staple for insects and flowers. I do a lot of shooting from hides and blinds where I generally use a 500mm f4.

My fishing kit has been evolving to a more minimalist side the last few years (the older I get, the less I want to carry and the more I want to just fish). If I'm hiking, it needs to fit into pockets, a small sling pack or mini-vest, so an Iphone or small waterproof point & shoot works best here. If I'm working from a boat or raft and there may be wildlife sightings, I'll take the Simms drypack with a Nikon DSLR and 200-500mm lens.
I'm keeping an eye on the mirrorless progress...a lot of good things developing there.
 

new2flyfishing

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My DSLR is an el cheapo, but still too expensive for me to take a chance that it might get dropped while fishing. Plus it is a lot of weight to carry around when fishing. Years ago I bought an Olympus E-510 with the 2 lens kit.....14-42 F3.5-5.6 and 40-150 F4-5.6 lenses. Later I purchased the 140-600 F4-5.6 and lastly the 50mm F2 Macro lens. It seemed like I always wanted a longer focal length than I had with my other cameras. Olympus was 2x while everyone else was 1.4x or 1.5x. I've no idea what is available today and don't want to know. I already have a beautiful SLR (film) setting around not getting used. A Canon Elan IIE. Although heavier, I actually like using the Canon more. But the ability to take hundreds of shots with the Olympus and not need to pay for developing the film (plus the film's original cost) far outways my preference for using the Canon.
 

coolkyle

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I like the size to quality ratio of Micro Four Thirds. I usually stick with a Panasonic G85 with the 14-140ii for a weather sealed fishing kit. Sometimes I want a smaller setup that fits inside my waders easily, and I grab a Panasonic GX85 with the tiny 20mm 1.7(40mm equivalent) prime lens.

I dream of one day having a Fuji X100V for fishing, and not relying on my nice zoom lens. It's just a sexy camera. But $1400 for a toy doesn't feed the kids...
 

blueeyedson

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When I take a camera, it's an Olympus TG-4. I think it takes pretty good pictures - not excellent but good enough for me. The main draw was the waterproof features such that I'd not have to worry about it going for a swim. My main complaint is the weight - not heavy per se, but if I could find a lighter version, it'd be of interest.
 
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