Working on my double haul

dynaflow

Well-known member
Messages
799
Reaction score
113
Location
Byron Bay...easternmost point of Australia
I know that the Kiritimati Guides are constantly amazed and frustrated by the number of visiting anglers who have spent lots of money on a dream trip to chase Bonefish but cannot cast....let alone double haul,which is a mandatory skill if you're a salt water fisherman.
 

myt1

Well-known member
Messages
1,467
Reaction score
165
Location
Scottsdale, AZ
I apologize if this has already been mentioned.

My double haul improved when I incorporated something, I forget what it is called, that is the opposite of creep...I was kinda the poster child for creep.

Once I get the rod to the end of the back stroke, while the line is still unfurling behind me, I raise the rod and move the rod a little further rearward.

I then start the forward cast in a somewhat downward motion, to compensate for the small amount of lift I gave the rod at the end of the backstroke.

Before, while waiting for the line to unfurl behind me, I think I would get impatient and then start the creep. If nothing else, lifting the rod and moving it slightly backwards at the end of the backstroke gives me something to do while the line is unfurling and I'm not tempted to start my forward swing too early with a creep.
 
Last edited:

silver creek

Well-known member
Messages
7,642
Reaction score
1,240
Location
Rothschld, Wisconsin
I apologize if this has already been mentioned.

My double haul improved when I incorporated something, I forget what it is called, that is the opposite of creep...I was kinda the poster child for creep.

Once I get the rod to the end of the back stroke, while the line is still unfurling behind me, I raise the rod and move the rod a little further rearward.

I then start the forward cast in a somewhat downward motion, to compensate for the small amount of lift I gave the rod at the end of the backstroke.

Before, while waiting for the line to unfurl behind me, I think I would get impatient and then start the creep. If nothing else, lifting the rod and moving it slightly backwards at the end of the backstroke, gives me something to do while the line is unfurling and I'm not tempted to start my forward swing too early with a creep.
It's called Drift. Drifting moves the rod and or rod tip backward. This increases the ability to perform a longer forrward rod stroke, and therefore increases the ability to make a longer cast.

Drift can be performed by rod rotation or rod translation as indicated in the illustration below.

 
Last edited:

jpielock1992

Well-known member
Messages
75
Reaction score
21
It timing though,how to mime that? Short of like hitting golf balls into a computer net game. And I realized, that I rarely <5% of the time,so I suck at at it. Cheers,Chet
 

jpielock1992

Well-known member
Messages
75
Reaction score
21
Here is a video with a easy way to learn the double haul.


Once you learn the double haul, the applications are not limited to "extra distance" or "windy conditions". I use it when fishing smaller streams to improve my accuracy by employing a second casting skill to "brake" my cast.

The analogy I am going to propose is that making an accurate cast is like parking a car. Your forward cast direction is the "steering wheel" that directs where the cast is going. If you have no brake, you have to be very precise with the accelerator so the car coast into the parking spot since you cannot slow the car down. However, if you can accelerate the car to the spot and then use a brake, the car comes to a stop exactly where you want it to.

I am going to propose that the double haul is the accelerator that propels the cast toward the spot you want to park your fly and that accelerating the cast prevents the cast from going off course. What is then needed is the brake for the cast, and that is the "O" ring shoot.

When you shoot line, place the tip of your thumb and index finger together to make a ring. This ring becomes an extra line guide for your line. But it is a line guide that you control. Close the ring and you have the line in your hand, open the ring and you can shoot the line. By opening and closing this ring, you can control the amount of line you shoot. It has the additional benefit, that when the fly lands, you immediately have line control and you are not grabbing for the loose line after the cast.



Now try casting again with the same amount of excess power and allow a few feet of line to shoot out before closing the ring. If the fly still bounces back, you needed to shoot more line to balance the excess energy. If the leader does not completely lay out, you shot too much line.

The only time you should drop the line when shooting is when you are going for maximum distance. The shooting ring you form with your fingers does add an extra bit of friction so it will limit distance a bit. However, to our benefit, it gives us the ability to feather our casts to lay down the cast with accuracy and delicacy. I usually overpower the cast a bit and then feather the amount of line I shoot so that I can shoot exactly the amount of line I want. It is the same thing a bass fisherman does when he throws a lure at a target and places his thumb against the the spool to adjust the amount of line to land his lure right on target.

After the shoot, you can immediately place the line under the index finger of your rod hand and use your off hand to strip in the line from behind your rod hand. Now you have complete control of the rod and line.

One other tip. When you shoot line, you should keep some space between your line hand and your rod hand. You need to keep the two separated or else there is the chance that the line you shoot will wrap around the reel. This is a common cause of line fouling even for shooters that drop the line.

I was taught to cast by Gary Borger and the O-ring shoot was a mandatory lesson. It was explained by Jason Borger in his former Blog. A hard "check" can help perform the "tuck" cast that beginners find so difficult.

Gary’s Blog has a post about the “O” ring shooting method. Read his blog below where he explains the "O" ring method of line control.

Gary Borger » Blog Archive » “O”-Ring Line Control

The double haul and the "O" ring brake can be used anywhere to improve casting accuracy. I use it on my local streams to improve my casting accuracy. Once the double haul and the "O" ring shoot becomes second nature and an integral part of your cast, you don't even notice you are doing it. It becomes a natural part of the way you cast.
I tried this in the back yard and the line slipped up and squeezed my balls! never again!
 

boisker

Well-known member
Messages
673
Reaction score
124
Location
Devon, UK
It timing though,how to mime that? Short of like hitting golf balls into a computer net game. And I realized, that I rarely <5% of the time,so I suck at at it. Cheers,Chet
i think pantomime works for timing as well... haul late in the stroke, when you start it probably won’t be late enough, but you can work on that as your actual haul whilst casting improves...
as for timing with the rod you should be able to feel when to feed the hand/line back to the rod as the line rolls out
I would also say that it’s easier to do fairly short hauls when you start and no need to haul that hard
When pantomiming i used to have a chopstick that I would hold as it gave something to rotate...
 

dynaflow

Well-known member
Messages
799
Reaction score
113
Location
Byron Bay...easternmost point of Australia
Yes,start short...and even closing your eyes so you can feel the rod bend (load) on the back cast is a good practice technique.Don't allow slack in the line and try to keep the routine in a straight line.It's basically muscle memory and second nature once you master it.Good luck!
 

RockNRiffle57

Active member
Messages
31
Reaction score
5
Location
New York
Wow, these videos and tips are great! Thanks for sharing, everyone.

I am slowly working on my (poor) double hauling and this thread is a wonderful resource.
 

LOC

Well-known member
Messages
466
Reaction score
333
Location
S. CA
Pantomime double haul and breaking the ice.
My friend was having a terrible time with this.

Might I say this if for folks who are really struggling with the coordination!
What I tried to do was replace the idea of the haul and give him a different coordination to focus on.
Once we changed the mindset from haul to the single task of a hand clap and then later a fist bump he got it.
If you are having trouble this may help you and for reference this if for a right handed caster.

Step one, start with your right hand up palm facing out as if you are telling someone to halt around twelve o'clock and hold it there. Another visual reference is taking the oath.
Now with your left hand open hanging down by your hip bring that hand up and give your right hand a clap and then return the left hand down back down by your hip in one smooth motion (the right hand remains still). Do this ten times in a row and it should be fairly easy to execute. So once again with your right hand up in a halt position bring your left hand up clap hands (make it pop) and bring your left hand back down by your hip.

Step two, change the right hand to a rod grip and place it as if you where stopping the rod on a back cast.

With your left hand hanging down by your hip make it into a fist this time.
Bring your left hand up and give your rod hand a 60's style fist bump instead of a clap.
Your left hand should come from below and meet the bottom of rod hand as if you were going to bump the bottom of a table.
Now return your haul hand back down next to your hip in one smooth motion. The mental goal is to focus on is bringing the hand up and making the bump and returning back by the hip.

Once again, do a bunch of bumps in a row till it's easy to execute and you can perform it without thinking.

Step three, now alternate the fist bumps between having your rod hand in the forward cast position and the back cast position.
Start slow at first and you can pause between forward and back cast if need be but you want to get to the point you can flow back and forth in a nice rythm.

Also as you improve with the exercise start to visualize your left pulling the line back down instead of it just falling and your right hand loading the rod as you move it forward and back

Not everyone will need to break it down to this method but if you have tried everything else give it a shot and I hope it helps...
:)
 
Last edited:

fishing hobo

Well-known member
Messages
328
Reaction score
17
The Lee Cumming's triangular method employed for double haul as shown by Paul Arden is a good way to learn. It is like Simon Gawsworth's method except that it is easier to see what you are doing when casting sideways then tilting the plane up. Some will argue that side casting needs additional technique therefore it is not suitable but I think most people will get the hang of it. If you cannot effectively shoot line w/o hauling then, you need to acquire that skill first. Good luck 🤞
 
Top