Yes, your opinions do matter! (Thoughts on a beginner setup.)

Davitticus Maximus

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You may want to consider looking to Cabelas though not their brand rods. Periodically they have good sales on higher end rods. Sage,Hardy,etc. It's a matter of checking often.
 

VaFisherman

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My brother purchased a Cabela's outfit when he retired because I had been asking him for years to fly fish with me but he was not sure he would like it. As it turns out he likes it very much. His Cabela's rod and the reel are serviceable but they, and I would assume any prepackaged outfits, put the cheapest fly line know to man on them. I think his had the Bass Pro Hobbs Creek $20.00 fly line on it. We replaced it just today with an old Rio Gold I had.

The fly line is as important as the rod and more important than the reel. Not knowing your budget but knowing how important a serviceable rod and line are I would recommend you purchase it from a fly shop and let them try and get to your budget. Redington, and Echo both have good entry level rods. If you must order it I think most rods made today will work with a good line, say a Cortland 333 or RIO or Scientific angler midpriced lines at a minimum, then get a reel with what money you have left. Echo makes a good reel for the money reel call is "Base", although it is heavy.
 

fq13

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Plus one to the above. The rod and line are the working parts of the rod. The reel is an aftertought. I have never lost a fish due to reel malfunction. I have failed to catch them due to poor casts.
 

Flyfisher for men

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b4d93r

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My brother purchased a Cabela's outfit when he retired because I had been asking him for years to fly fish with me but he was not sure he would like it. As it turns out he likes it very much. His Cabela's rod and the reel are serviceable but they, and I would assume any prepackaged outfits, put the cheapest fly line know to man on them. I think his had the Bass Pro Hobbs Creek $20.00 fly line on it. We replaced it just today with an old Rio Gold I had.

The fly line is as important as the rod and more important than the reel. Not knowing your budget but knowing how important a serviceable rod and line are I would recommend you purchase it from a fly shop and let them try and get to your budget. Redington, and Echo both have good entry level rods. If you must order it I think most rods made today will work with a good line, say a Cortland 333 or RIO or Scientific angler midpriced lines at a minimum, then get a reel with what money you have left. Echo makes a good reel for the money reel call is "Base", although it is heavy.
Yea, the line would get replaced immediately, thanks for the tips on the lines.

A better setup is definitely in the works, I live about two hours from anything and I'm just getting started so my time on the water is regulated to weekends right now. Good news is a move is in the near future, just not exactly sure where yet. (Stay in Colorado or move to Texas.) But the time thing is playing into it as well. Ultimately my dream setup is a Scott rod and the Abel Colorado reel.
 

hatidua

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IF, you really want to go down the fly fishing road, and I'm the last person to push it, I'd go to as many of the "free intro to fly fishing" classes as you can, most shops in my area do it almost weekly this time of year. If nothing else it'd give you an opportunity to cast a whole host of rods, ranging from those well within your budget to those that may stretch to beyond what you want to spend. By doing this you will get a feel for what the extra cost on some rods may yield (or not).

While there is definitely merit to the saying "buy once, cry once", I'd only suggest that route if you are certain you are going to stick with it. As others have suggested, if you may someday want to move up, or move out of fly fishing, I'd get a name brand that is easy to sell. The usual suspects (Sage/Orvis/Loomis/etc) will hold their value far better than some of the other brands, whether that is merited or not.

Have fun.
 

bigspencer

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IF, you really want to go down the fly fishing road, and I'm the last person to push it, I'd go to as many of the "free intro to fly fishing" classes as you can, most shops in my area do it almost weekly this time of year. If nothing else it'd give you an opportunity to cast a whole host of rods, ranging from those well within your budget to those that may stretch to beyond what you want to spend.
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bigspencer

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Best of luck/enjoyment on your trip which you must have taken by now. One needs to watch the weight on any reel that comes with an "outfit". The reels involved are often those reels that haven't been sold yet...and are often too heavy for the rod, if you're in the "improving" level.....just a $.01 opinion..... If you're in the improving level of casting....one thing you don't need is a spaghetti noodle for a rod that has been clearly outweighed by the reel....
 

mikemac1

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Think about what you are doing. You are buying a set of tools that you may or may not actually know how to use. If you are an adequate fly caster, then making an informed decision on what tools to buy is a logical next step. However, if not, then the BEST decision you can make is to defer the purchase of the tools until you learn how to cast. My detailed advice can be read here: Fly Fishing - Step One?
 

teledan

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That Orvis Clearwater is a great rod. A buddy of mine wanted to get into fly fishing and he was originally going to go cheap but I convinced him to go with the Orvis. He was really glad he did! The same guy also bought a Redington Path later on and FWIW, it broke the first time he fished it. The tip just snapped while he was casting. Luckily the shop he bought it at gave him a full refund. That is another thing, I would highly recommend buying through a good local shop if at all possible.
 

JoJer

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Yes, by all means, spend money on a fly line up grade. It's well worth it and these days there are so many, you can find a line that fits the rods and your style and waters.
You asked, so, I like TFO rods. Mine is old and I'm sure they've changed. One thing I like about mine- it's over-built. It didn't stop me from breaking it. Twice. I looked at TFOs in Sportsman's a few days ago. Comparable weights and lengths are much lighter these days. I looked and a bottom end rod, a mid-priced one and an upsell at 3X the price of the first. I have a couple of St Croix, too. Also old. The action of my 9' 4 weight is like what people buy glass for now.
 

cooutlaw

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You've probably already made a move judging by the age of the thread....but if not...I'll be an outlier.....check out the Redington Classic Trout rod (arguably one of, if not the, best rod in this price point)...which can be had often on sale (ebay)....hop on craigslist or ebay and buy a decent used $30-50 reel......you'd be under your $150 budget....then you said you were going to upgrade the line anyway......hit a local shop or online and grab a decent line- even the SA Mastery Version of Trout Taper ($59-$69) and you have a very decent set-up...one that is really not entry but probably closer to mid-grade and you may not even see a need to upgrade for awhile....my point: Piecing together gear can often surpass the quality of "kits" and come out at a comparable price point.
 
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