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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    154

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    My experience is that serrated jaws (as needle-nose pliers usually have) have a tendency to break hooks when flattening barbs.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Atlanta/West Yellowstone
    Posts
    461

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    Quote Originally Posted by el jefe View Post
    Something like this would check a lot of your boxes:

    Scissor Forceps with Power Jaws [platinum] - StreamWorks - Affordable Fly Fishing Gear

    Also, for cutting tippet, nippers are probably better for that, as they allow you to cut the tippet closer to the knot.
    I was about to say you can find some good forceps/scissors for $20 or less when i saw this post. This is a good example and there are many others. Nippers should cost $5 or less, and if not drugstore nail clippers certainly do. All this will seem more logical to you the first time you drop some expensive multi tool type gadget in 12 feet of water. Those gadgets have a lot of uses -- preferably away from the water!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Anthem, AZ
    Posts
    1,331
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    You haven't stated what species you're going to be targeting, so this may be off-base.

    However, if you're going to be fishing for trout or other small-mouthed fish, that are commonly fished for using sz 20 or smaller flies, your average needle-nose pliers are going to be too big to grab these tiny flies. Also some trout you might catch are going to be on the order of 6 inches or less. Getting needle-nose pliers into their small mouths is going to be an issue.

    On the bright side, forceps/hemostats aren't expensive (I think they average about $14). And many come with scissors and barb anvils built-in. Mine is a Rapala with scissors, barb anvil and a hook-eye needle. I almost never use the scissors, except when I drop my nippers in the water, which happens about once every two years or so.

    Of course, if you're not going for trout/smaller fish, then ignore my post.

    Peace.
    "Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn." ~Chuck Clark

  4. #14

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    I carry a small multi-purpose tool but it is more for potential repairs than fishing..and I don't go ultra light. Serrated plier or hemostat jaws are unacceptable for crushing hook barbs, smooth jaws required. I tend to use my fingers 95% of the time for removing flies from a trout's mouth but taken deeply, hemostats do help on smaller fish. I recommend a simple but good nipper like Dr. Slick or Orvis on a zinger for the all important cutting of leader/tippet work and trimming knots. Learn to tie knots well without employing tools. Fly fishing for trout is very manual, few tools are required.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Iowa, southern edge of Driftless Area
    Posts
    761

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    "Pretty much every stream where there are trout is approx a 1/2 hour to an hour's hike in."

    Do you have a bluegill pond close by? Might make sense to do a trial run to make sure you have what you need before hiking in for an hour.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Hudsonville, Michigan
    Posts
    1,715
    Blog Entries
    17

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    Hi City Rat, the guys have things well covered, I just wanted to welcome you to the forum, you'll like it here!



    Denny

  7. #17

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    City Rat, When I was a younger man I used to back pack into the high back country, sometimes for extended periods of time. Of course I carried a tent, sleeping bag and pad, an aluminum fry pan and matches, a little bottle of olive oil and a knife. Oh, and a dog too.

    Fishing wise, I had a 5 piece Scott Pow-R-Ply glass rod (today it would be 4 pc. graphite) in a light weight tube strapped to my frame, a reel with line and leader + a spare leader and enough spools of tippet to re-build, one small box of flies, a little bottle of silicone floatant and a nipper. A hat, sunglasses and a compact rain shell rounded out my outfit. No waders or boots other than my well mink oiled Pivettas which I was reluctant to get too wet. I did some wet wading and man those mountain rivers could be icy...I'd have to set by the fire to dry my jeans while frying a brace of pan sized trout for me and a fat whitefish for the dog.

  8. Likes WildTroutDFO, City Rat liked this post
  9. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    17,263
    Blog Entries
    132

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    Welcome to the forum Rat,

    That in itself sounds strange but you picked it not me...….. I have a Leatherman like most others do but it isn't a great fishing tool. Having a pair of forceps (they are cheap) clamped on your outerwear somewhere is a good thing. I still carry one even though I have a regular fishing plier on my belt. Cutting line? Nippers are a must and I can tell you we've had many a spirited discussion about today's selection of nippers from the $2.99 drug store special up to the high end Abel Nipper.

    The Leatherman stays in my boats emergency box where it won't get lost, the fishing plier I use is the Dr. Slick Pisces model and you can get them for about $24.99 most places or online. Other than those 3 things I travel pretty light but they all come in handy.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Rappahanock, Potomac and Fingerlakes Region
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    Quote Originally Posted by sweetandsalt View Post
    City Rat, When I was a younger man I used to back pack into the high back country, sometimes for extended periods of time. Of course I carried a tent, sleeping bag and pad, an aluminum fry pan and matches, a little bottle of olive oil and a knife. Oh, and a dog too.

    Fishing wise, I had a 5 piece Scott Pow-R-Ply glass rod (today it would be 4 pc. graphite) in a light weight tube strapped to my frame, a reel with line and leader + a spare leader and enough spools of tippet to re-build, one small box of flies, a little bottle of silicone floatant and a nipper. A hat, sunglasses and a compact rain shell rounded out my outfit. No waders or boots other than my well mink oiled Pivettas which I was reluctant to get too wet. I did some wet wading and man those mountain rivers could be icy...I'd have to set by the fire to dry my jeans while frying a brace of pan sized trout for me and a fat whitefish for the dog.
    Now that sounds like good times!

  11. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Rappahanock, Potomac and Fingerlakes Region
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Some of this gear seems redundant...maybe

    So after giving it some thought I am not thrilled about dropping my multitool in the crick, never to be seen again. I tried a cheap pair of 5-6 inch long needle nose pliers. They lasted about a week as I tried to de-barb the hooks on some flies with it. They fit inside the bend of the small nymph hooks ok but the serrated jaws didn't do a reliable job mashing the barbs, they always just a bit behind of the barb. So I will go with a set of needle nose fishing pliers and clippers. I'll try that setup for approx a month and see how they do de-barbing hooks and removing hooks from fish. I will re-visit this all in approx a month. Thanks to all for all of the feedback and input. It really helps a newbie.

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