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  1. #11

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    I don’t have any issues wading with my progressive trifocal sunglasses. But my regular glasses are progressive trifocals; so I am used to them.

  2. Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    I have to use bi-focals for reading, but I can not drive or wade, or do anything physical with them. I got some bi-focal sunglasses a few years ago, for me a big waste of money. So my set-up when fishing is clic-its 2.75, for tying flies and tippet repair, Smith sunglasses for fishing and wading. Its a pain to change glasses out to tie on a new fly or some new tippet, but that's what you gotta deal with when you mature!
    Mike.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Snake, Clearwater and tribs
    Posts
    686

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    Quote Originally Posted by KnottyTippet View Post
    Thanks for all the great input—opinions are varied but all are educational.

    If I do add bifocals or progressives it sounds like the way to go is progressives (less distracting/noticeable, plus I’m already used to progressives in my eyeglasses). But a quick follow-on question for those of you who fish with progressives—are you wading and do they create any problem for you moving through a stream? If they’re manageable, then heck why not have ‘em? If not, it would be nice to know!

    Thanks again to all of you, the guidance is much appreciated!
    I no longer have a problem with progressives when wading. I may have when I started wearing glasses about 10y ago, but I also had trouble with stairs!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    south of Joplin
    Posts
    383

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    Quote Originally Posted by KnottyTippet View Post
    Thanks for all the great input—opinions are varied but all are educational.

    If I do add bifocals or progressives it sounds like the way to go is progressives (less distracting/noticeable, plus I’m already used to progressives in my eyeglasses). But a quick follow-on question for those of you who fish with progressives—are you wading and do they create any problem for you moving through a stream? If they’re manageable, then heck why not have ‘em? If not, it would be nice to know!

    Thanks again to all of you, the guidance is much appreciated!
    This is why I said that if you are used to progressives to stay with that, wading is walking and how you tilt your head when you walk determines which part of the lens you are looking through, when I first got progressives I couldn't watch a cashier make change without becoming woozy as the counting hand moved my eyes back and forth across the change over area. Once I was used to them I climbed ladders, scaffolds, hills and creek banks up and down without a problem. With my current bifocals I often forget to tilt my head just so and that can cause a misstep. I believe that once I'm more accustomed to them that they will become natural also.
    The problems I have encountered were not in the water so much as in traversing the bank to and along the stream. Stream bottoms tend to be more uniform than the banks do.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    MD Suburbs of DC
    Posts
    2,774

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    Quote Originally Posted by KnottyTippet View Post
    Thanks for all the great input—opinions are varied but all are educational.

    If I do add bifocals or progressives it sounds like the way to go is progressives (less distracting/noticeable, plus I’m already used to progressives in my eyeglasses). But a quick follow-on question for those of you who fish with progressives—are you wading and do they create any problem for you moving through a stream? If they’re manageable, then heck why not have ‘em? If not, it would be nice to know!

    Thanks again to all of you, the guidance is much appreciated!
    NO. Progressives don't cause any problems. They work the same as your current glasses do. The Costas with the glass lenses you previously mentioned in progressives are about the best. For trout fishing, the copper color with no mirror are the best in my opinion. They will let you see things on the water that you wouldn't otherwise see. If you do a search for Costas here on the forum, you will find multiple threads discussing them.
    Todd

    "If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles."
    ~ Doug Larson

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    732

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    It cost a pretty penny to get separated sunglasses with the progressive lenses and polarization but worth it. If you are already use to progressive lenses you will have no problems and won’t notice a thing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #17

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    Ditto here. I moved to progressives for my regular glasses a couple of years ago and have never looked back. This year, I ponied-up for same in sunglasses (Maui Jims) and can't believe I waited so long. Just got tired of having to move glasses away to read phone, GPS, map, etc., and of course now I can tie on a fly w/out taking them off. I also have a pair of the flip down magnifiers on brim of cap, which is nice for threading 7x onto tiny flies.

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  9. Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    Quote Originally Posted by KnottyTippet View Post
    Hi all—I’m about to buy a new pair of fishing sunglasses, this time a prescription set. Hoping to hear anyone’s experience with bifocals or progressives in theirs. Adding that feature is extra $$’s and I’m wondering if it’s worth it or even a good idea. My eyesight is still good enough that magnification isn’t absolutely necessary to tie knots and do finer work but it certainly doesn’t hurt either.

    So what do you guys who need reading glasses do when it comes to sunglasses? Do you have progressive lenses or bifocals, or do you go without?

    Also, as for brand, I’ll probably go with either Costa’s and their 580G lense or Smith’s Chromapop in a copper/bronze polarized. Do you think I’m on the right track there?

    Thanks for any advice you care to offer!
    I have worn glasses for distance for 65 years started age 12 and close for 33 years. My distance vision post cataract surgery is now 20/40 used to be 20/200+ but my near vision is still plus 2.25-2.50. My clear lenses are glass progressives. All of my recent fishing Polaroids have been single vision. Depending on your distance 'script you may find glass lenses very heavy. My preference for mainly salt flats and Blue water is single vision because of cost, and tint selection. I can change salt flies without close lenses as for fresh I'll drop polars off on strap put my clear on. I have one pair of Smith's glass polarchromic copper which I ordered directly on sale for 325.00. However, my last attempt at Smith they changed their glass lab and now only brown or gray...so it's back to plastic. I have used an online lens company with very good results for the three pictured glasses. Replacement Prescription Eyeglass Lenses, Sunglasses & Frames I have my eyes refracted at the Indiana School of Optometry or IU Medicine Ophthalmology...obtain prescription with interpupilary distance noted...obtain the frames online, spec the lenses and send...the lenses pictured are all Essilor Experio CR-39 single vision: in Copper with gold mirror with a Julbo original frame, Sunflower with a Randolph frame, Ruby with Smith Guides Choice frame and Crizal Sun anti-glare backside only. All priced 325-390 including frame...the latter was the 80 for the gold mirror.
    Attachment 21289

    Attachment 21290

    IMO your biggest fiscal consideration would be whether or not your eyes have stabilized; so that you won't be changing prescriptions every two years that in Costa's that would be costly about 750 glass copper progressive and 50 for mirror and real close to an NRX every two years

  10. #19
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    601

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    I have bifocals also. Tried to use progressives but found it too difficult to do the kind of photography work I do with them. I had bifocal sunglasses as well and they worked fine but when it came time for a new prescription I thought I'd save a little and bought a pair Cocoons - oversized sunglasses that go over my regular glasses. They work fine for me.

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  12. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    732

    Default Re: Bifocals in prescription sunglasses

    Another option which is what I did until my current glasses was to get the transition lenses that lighten and darken depending on the light.
    In a way I do miss them because my sunglasses stay in the truck and are not always convenient to get.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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