Thanks Thanks:  1
Likes Likes:  9
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1

    Default Please Help Identify!

    Hey everyone!

    Last summer I backpacked to an alpine lake in Western Washington and caught several fish. Elevation was 3800' and the lake was fairly small with snow runoff nearly year round. I caught two or three typical rainbows (picture included), but what really made me scratch my head was one that I assumed to be a cutthroat at first glance. It was a female and has the red gill plate, but no slash under the jaw. What really interested me was the DARK red fins with slightly white edges (but not on the dorsal or pectorals). She seemed to be an old timer based on the wear and tear on her fins and seemed to be losing scales sadly. Released her right away after snapping this picture, but the longer it's been since then, the more I wonder what she was.

    I know there are cases of trout cross-breeding (Tiger Trout), especially in small lakes with little contact and it becomes their only option for survival, but I'm not finding any pictures like this anywhere online. Thanks for your help identifying this beauty!IMG_0775.jpgDSC00781.jpg

  2. Likes ivory arrow, cpiercem liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    17,659
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    Hi Neil,

    I don't fish down there but the fish on left appears to be a typical rainbow trout. You could probably research whether or not the particular lake receives stockings. Sometimes the spawning process will account for some pretty ragged fins on trout but if they are planted they can be that way from hatchery life also.

    One thing for sure that will help with future questions would be to get a small camera capable of a little better image quality. The better the pictures the more positive the ID process.

    Ard

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    326
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    I'd call that out as a cutbow, we have a lot of them in our neck of the woods, mostly found in high elevation mountain lakes and streams. It's a rainbow/cutthroat hybrid...pretty common here. They can become whoppers. Some states are trying to eradicate them as exclusively native cut throat populations are becoming tough to come by. I believe, if not mistaken, the fins get "red-er" during spawn. May explain, the beat up fins too. pics below:

    https://i0.wp.com/flylordsmag.com/wp...size=696%2C464

    https://nas.er.usgs.gov/XIMAGESERVER...0416105002.jpg


    Link on how to identify: How To Identify A Cutbow - Rainbow/Cutthroat Hybrid Pictures

    Cutbow Trout:

    Cutbows are fertile hybrids of rainbow trout and one of the cutthroat species. Where rainbows and cutthroats occur naturally together, these hybrids rarely occur. However, with the introduction of rainbows into native cutthroat populations, hybridization often occurs and is view as a serious threat to cutthroat populations due to the loss of genetic integrity.

    Depending on the rainbow-cutthroat mix, these hybrids may take on markings very close to either parentage, or any of numerous blends. Typically they will have a bit of the orange/red slash on the throat that is so distinctive of cutthroats and often with a hint of the red stripe down the side that is distinctive of rainbows.

    These hybrids can show in most any water that native cutthroats exit and where rainbows exist, the clear, cold water of mountain streams and lakes. Cutbows are also intentionally stocked in some states to provide anglers with another fishing opportunity.

    The life cycle, habitat requirements, and food preferences are the same as their parents, which are essentially the same for both species, as they are very similar fish.
    Last edited by cooutlaw; 01-07-2019 at 11:32 PM.

  5. #4

    Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    That's just a typical wild rainbow. My local native redside rainbows look just like that until they get to maybe 15 inches. The fish in my avatar picture, if you can see it, looks pretty similar. Generally lake fish don't look like that, they're more silvery, especially if they're hatchery fish.

  6. Thanks Ard thanked for this post
    Likes nevadanstig liked this post
  7. Default Please Help Identify!

    I am going to agree with the others. I donít see anything out of the ordinary. They call them rainbows for a reason. They can show a lot of different colors from fish to fish. Even if they arenít hybridized.












    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    17,659
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    Now that we have that solved here's one for you identification types



    During the years here I've caught many trout with everything from the pure silver sides of a fresh steelhead to this little guy above. I fish the river it came from every fall for a couple days and have never seen any of his kin as of yet.

    So what is that?

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  9. Likes ivory arrow liked this post
  10. Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    Thatís a doozy Ard. Interesting looking fish.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    17,659
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    It appeared to be a male of maybe 12" and healthy.



    Same fish different angle, agreed that it was really a one of a kind for me. I've been catching them for quite a while and never saw one like that. The river is a glacial type with nomadic trout populations that no doubt travel great distances between fall and winter so I have no idea if I'll ever see another.

    I find a lot of what I see called Leopard Rainbows and all kinds like I said earlier. I like the all silver ones because I'm pretty sure they have came in from the Inlet. That's what keeps me fishing, looking for those larger sea runs

    BTW I am not sure but I think the red under the jaw was blood from the edge of the jaw. The hook was a #6 Bartleet with a Jock O' Dee traditional tied to it. It could have been pigment in the fish too, I really forget.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  12. #9

    Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    Thank you everyone! First post on the forum and I'm blown away by the quick and in depth responses! Cheers!

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    326
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Please Help Identify!

    Sorry Gents, respectfully, I'll stick with my initial response....I would have totally agreed with common Rainbow.. EXCEPT... for the white tipped fins...considered the dead giveaway of identification (genetic crossbreeding symptom-mutation) explained in more detail if you read the previous links I posted.

    I'm not a smart guy and certainly no expert on fish biology, but I get my flies from a very avid local fly tier (I tie but not very well), who is also one of the head fisheries biologist for Colorado Division of Wildlife by day job, and after I asked the same thing, he graciously took a few minutes to help me identify the differences. I knew no difference, and honestly wasn't pinpoint enough in my observations to catch the indicators.

    After his explanation it made sense- ANY Hybrid can be a mix of genes and colorations, some traits from all contributors, but regardless of the parentage, ALL hybrids will have white tipped fins...ALL pure species will not....additionally, he confirmed that hybridization is so common it may effect 15%+ of total fish population.. and continues for generations and generations of fish...and that people catch hybrids constantly and never know they are hybrids....he explained it like this; Rainbow X CutThroat = Cutbow, now cutbow breeds another rainbow...new fish looks exactly like rainbow...but still has a white tipped fin or two...three generations later of all rainbow breeding....exactly a rainbow....but still carries maybe only one small white tipped fin....the white tipped fin is the mark of the beast, so to speak.

    He jokingly explained that biologist have still never figured out a way how to control who the trout date.

    For what it's worth, that was the explanation I received and my understanding. I'm assuming, that since he is a way smarter guy than me, that he is probably accurate and figure I'll go with that.
    Last edited by cooutlaw; 01-09-2019 at 08:45 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Can anyone identify this for me ?
    By VT1 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-30-2018, 06:55 PM
  2. Help Identify this Fly
    By bob3700 in forum Flies
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-14-2016, 05:49 PM
  3. Any way to identify this rod?
    By Supplicate in forum Bamboo Fly Rods
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-14-2015, 11:27 PM
  4. Can you identify these??
    By lthrnk03 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-01-2014, 10:32 PM
  5. Please help me Identify..
    By loveforthedryfly in forum Rocky Mountain Range
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-31-2013, 05:35 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •