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Thread: 10 more items

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Metuchen, N.J.
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    Default 10 more items

    This Should be listed as one of the ten. It's from the CJTU site

    10 STEPS TO SAVE A TROUT'S LIFE !!!

    1) USE BARBLESS HOOKS--OR CRIMP THE BARB WITH A PAIR OF NEEDLE-NOSE PLIERS. THIS NOT ONLY MAKES HOOK REMOVAL EASIER BUT ALSO PREVENTS INTERNAL DAMAGE TO THE FISH. IF YOU USE BARBLESS HOOKS, THE ONLY WAY YOU'LL REALLY HURT THE FISH IS IF YOU HOOK IT IN THE GILLS. IF YOU KEEP A TIGHT LINE,YOU'LL LAND JUST AS MANY AS WITH BARBED HOOKS.

    2) LAND THE FISH AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE, ESPECIALLY DURING WARM WEATHER. THE SHORTER THE FIGHT THE BETTER CHANCE IT WILL SURVIVE.

    3) USE A LANDING NET WITH SOFT COTTON MESHING - IT MINIMIZES DAMAGE TO THE FISH. COARSE NYLON MESH CAN CAUSE INJURY AND INFECTION. AVOID BEACHING THE FISH ON DRY LAND.

    4) MAKE SURE YOUR HANDS AND NET ARE WET. THE MUCOUS COAT OF THE FISH PROTECTS IT FROM BACTERIAL AND FUNGAL INFECTIONS. THE LESS YOU DISTURB IT, THE BETTER.

    5) TRY NOT TO LIFT THE TROUT ALL THE WAY OUT OF THE WATER. TURN THE TROUT UPSIDE-DOWN IN THE NET. THIS USUALLY PARALYZES HIM MAKING HOOK REMOVAL EASIER. HOLD THE FISH GENTLY IN THE MIDDLE OF THE BACK, USING THE NET TO IMPROVE YOUR GRIP. DON'T SQUEEZE THE FISH, ESPECIALLY AROUND THE MID-SECTION.

    6) USE FINGERTIPS, OR BETTER YET, MEDICAL FORCEPS TO GRASP THE HOOK CLOSE TO THE HOOK EYE. CAREFULLY EASE THE HOOK BACKWARDS UNTIL IT COMES LOOSE. AVOID CONTACT WITH THE GILLS. IF THE HOOK IS SWALLOWED TOO DEEPLY, JUST CUT THE LINE AS CLOSE TO THE MOUTH AS POSSIBLE. THE COST OF THE HOOK IS NOT WORTH THE TROUTS LIFE.

    7) SLIDE THE TROUT OUT OF THE NET TO A POINT DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF YOU.
    HOLD THE FISH FACING INTO THE CURRENT, SUPPORTING IT WITH BOTH HANDS--ONE BENEATH AND BEHIND THE PECTORAL FINS, THE OTHER LIGHTLY ENCIRCLING THE WRIST OF THE TAIL. AVOID STRONG CURRENTS THAT WILL SWEEP TIRED FISH DOWNSTREAM. MOVE THE FISH SLOWLY AND GENTLY IN A TIGHT OVAL, KEEPING THE FISH COMPLETELY SUBMERGED AND ALWAYS FACING INTO THE CURRENT.

    8} DON'T LET THE TROUT GO UNTIL IT IS FIGHTING TO GET OUT OF YOUR GRASP.

    9) KEEP AN EYE ON THE FISH FOR AS LONG AS YOU CAN. IF IT STARTS TO TILT OR TIP, RE-NET IT AND TRY AGAIN TO REVIVE IT.
    10} REMEMBER THAT WHEN THE WEATHER IS WARM THE FISH ARE ALREADY STRESSED. SO RELEASE THEM AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Missouri City (near Houston), Texas
    Posts
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    Question Re: 10 more items

    FISHN50, good points. However, am curious about # 3. Wouldn't rubber nets be even easier on the trout? Perhaps this CJTU site list predates the still-relatively-new rubber nets.
    On the whole, I'd rather be in Wyoming . . .
    Fly2:

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Metuchen, N.J.
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    Default Re: 10 more items

    Good Point. When we came up with these the only rubber nets were big, heavy, & not really suitable for carrying on your back in a stream, I still carry a small, wood, soft mesh, catch & release net but I will replace it if I find a rubber one the same size & wt.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Missouri City (near Houston), Texas
    Posts
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    Default Re: 10 more items

    Quote Originally Posted by FISHN50 View Post
    Good Point. When we came up with these the only rubber nets were big, heavy, & not really suitable for carrying on your back in a stream, I still carry a small, wood, soft mesh, catch & release net but I will replace it if I find a rubber one the same size & wt.
    Funny you mention this, because I just bought a replacement rubber net from Cabela's to (maybe just temporarily) replace the "knotless soft cotton net" on my telescopic landing net (Scandanavian origin). This original net wasn't worn out, but I decided to spend $20 to see if the weight penalty of rubber netting was worth its more "trout friendly" reputation. I should add that the apparent less entanglement of flies -particularly tandem rigs - in the netting was also a major factor to me.

    We'll see just how big a handicap carrying this obviously-heavier net when I wade will be. I'm fairly strong, but then, I carry a lot of ****, so I'll report back next spring when I first use this new rubber net (replacement).

    Happy New Year!
    On the whole, I'd rather be in Wyoming . . .
    Fly2:

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