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Thread: Winter in New England

  1. Default Winter in New England

    Despite the fact that we have gone from a ridiculous abnormally warm fall directly into deep winter (sub zero) tonight, I'm packing away my waterfowling gear and getting the itch for some fly fishing... make that WINTER fly fishing... when the thermometer does crawl back above freezing.

    I'm curious on any tactics and particularly winter midge nymph fishing. I haven't fished with midge patterns before.

    Based on what I've read, my thought is to pair tiny midge nymphs below small black winter stone fly nymphs in slow water below riffles.

    Some of my friends have had success on hold over browns on a couple local rivers that allow year round open water fishing.

    Thanks for any discussion.


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  2. #2

    Default Re: Winter in New England

    out of seacoast n.h ....... the ogunquit river in southern me is okay.... where are you out of ?

  3. Default Re: Winter in New England

    I'm in Manchester, ME... near Augusta.

    Curious about tactics and patterns for winter trout. I will select only the warmest days, and I do understand the fishing can be very slow.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    1,941

    Default Re: Winter in New England

    If you get low water to fish, sink midges down and across, then raise the rod tip when they drift into likely lies.

    "Every [child] has the right to a first fish. On this particular planet, no man is granted a greater privilege than to be present and to assist in the realization of this moment". Bill Heavey

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    328

    Default Re: Winter in New England

    My buddy and I were fishing this week on the Swift in Massachusetts. Temps in the mid 30's. Very little action all day on all the usual flys that people seem to have luck with there. Plenty of fish in the river because we could see them clearly. At the end of the day without having brought anything to hand, and with a healthy dose of frustration, my buddy threw a big white dry fly. Boom, big rainbow.

  6. Default Re: Winter in New England

    Thanks!

    Seems like I keep hearing success on opposite ends I'd the spectrum. Tiny understated nymphs / midges... or big bold flies that just trigger an instinct strike?

    Little bit warmer and I'll be out there frustrating myself.

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  7. #7

    Default Re: Winter in New England

    Not in New England. I do get up to Vermont but in warmer weather. I'll go out here in SE PA when the temperatures go into the upper 30s or into the 40s. I fish a couple of the local creeks. One that's stocked and one with wild fish. In the stocked creek you can usually see the fish you're targeting, not so much in the other creek. I usually go out hoping to hit a midge hatch and rising fish. If there are risers, then I fish one or the other of my favorite midge patterns. If not I'll fish a combination of larger bead head soft hackle PT nymph, size 16 or 18 with a smaller one, size 20 or 22 or with a bead head Green Weenie size 18 or 20 as the dropper. I'll also use a small white woolly bugger size 16 or 18 as the lead fly. If the nymphs don't work, I'll tie on one of the midge dries as the dropper. I've tried larger Woolly Buggers and small streamers but have only gotten follows with them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Holliston, MA, USA
    Posts
    607

    Default Re: Winter in New England

    Quote Originally Posted by photoguy View Post
    My buddy and I were fishing this week on the Swift in Massachusetts. Temps in the mid 30's. Very little action all day on all the usual flys that people seem to have luck with there. Plenty of fish in the river because we could see them clearly. At the end of the day without having brought anything to hand, and with a healthy dose of frustration, my buddy threw a big white dry fly. Boom, big rainbow.
    The Swift can be like that, especially in winter. I've never had topwater luck in the winter, but I hear that it happens year round--Griffith's gnats can work well, or so I'm told.

    I've had my best winter Swift luck on size 16 - 20 midge pupae, tight line in calm water and under an indicator in riffles. Tiny, size 22, grey scuds have worked for me really well, too. None of this works for me consistently. The Swift can be a harsh mistress.
    Cheers,
    --Rob

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