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  1. Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    An update. I also bought a snowbee dicontinued integrated Scandi in 8/9# with mutiple tips included. 36grams so dead in the middle. 9/10# NLA and also at 40grams so a little too heavy. Line was discounted so even if line doesn't suit I have multiple tips (I don't see how it won't suit bearing in mind it is within recommended wt).
    Forgot to say, going to go get a lesson in a couple of weeks, probably the most important part of the equation.
    Last edited by fishing hobo; 05-09-2018 at 04:26 PM.

  2. Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    I tried mono and it's just not for me. The best running lines I've used are the Steve Godshall ELF running lines. The shoot and handle very well.

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  4. #23
    Join Date
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    Kincardine, Ontario
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    Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    Here's what I've used. My favourite so far is Airflo ridge coated running line. Low stretch so you can feel your fly if it ticks bottom or if a steelhead sneezes on your fly, it has very good grip in cold conditions, and shoots relatively easily.

    Miracle braid- great grip and shootability with low stretch as well, but ices up guides very quicky in freezing temps.

    Mono- not a huge fan, shoots to the moon, doesn't ice up guides easily, but not as grippy and too much stretch for my liking.

    P-line hydrafloat 50lb- I use this on my trout spey setup and it works well too. Zero stretch, shoots far, but doesn't handle as well with stripping.
    Danny

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  6. #24
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    I'm another S. Godshall user, I got the first 4 years ago and will be ordering another (my 5th) on Monday. I use the lines he calls a Super Scandi which are a 45 foot head with integrated runner. They are the best length for where I fish, 45 foot head + 14 feet of leader + length of rod = shoot ten foot of line and you are able to cover80 feet roughly without overworking yourself

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  7. Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    I've yet to try the shooting head with coated running line. Hard work this DH casting for a small guy like me.

  8. Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    Miracle Braid is my shooting line of choice:
    - S H O O T s !!!
    - Pretty much tangle free
    - Handling qualtiy
    - Not tooooo expensive
    - Enables super stealthy finger-cuff loop connections.

    But... it ain't so hot in winter with it's braid carrying water.

    For winter, it's SA amber mono - used to come with their Extreme head kits.

    Fly line coated shooting: Best bang for my buck has been Wulff Tracer - looped, white color with hot orange (sighter) over-hang section.

    On recent trip I used the new fangled connect-core shooting line < not impressed.

    YMMV

  9. #27

    Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    Quote Originally Posted by flav View Post
    Here's how I look at it;
    Mono shoots farther and easier, but needs to be stretched and is hard to hold in the cold.

    Coated shooting line floats and is easier to deal with in the cold, can be mended, but sticks to the surface so you need to hold more slack line in loops and it doesn't cast as far.

    I've used both, but I prefer coated line. I get plenty of distance, 70 to 80 feet is my comfort zone, and beyond that I feel I lose control of my fly anyway. What I like best is the mass and friction hold my cast back a little and causes the head to turn over better and lay out straighter than when I cast with mono. For me its all about line control and presentation.
    I was going to say basically what flav said about mono shooting farther and being hard to hold in the cold. Coated line is easier to deal with in the cold but doesn't shoot as far. I have both on different reels, and at one point I thought I would go to all mono.

    This fall, I noticed that my head wasn't turning over well, casting with the mono running line, and thought it was just my leader. But I think flav may be on to something: mono shoots so fast that maybe the line is moving too fast to turn over properly.

    I was so impressed with the distances I was getting with mono, I wasn't considering the downsides of using it. I'm reconsidering now.


    One other thing I like about mono that hasn't been mentioned, is it tends to not tangle on its way out. I've found I can just let it fall where it wants when stripping in, and let 'er rip on the way out. Coated line prefers being coiled before shooting.
    "At least we don't have any stinky fish we gotta clean."

    Bob Nall

  10. #28
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    I have a question.

    When you guys say "shoots farther" or "distance", what are we talking about in relation to total length of a cast.

    I mean length from your feet to the end of the line where the fly is at.

    The only ways I have to even estimate total distance are to know lengths of my line components. If I am casting a 45 foot head and I know that my leader is 14 feet long I know that those 2 components are 59 feet in length. That line would be on a 14 foot long Sage X so when I cast and fish there are also 12 feet of rod extended out with the cast so the total (without and shooting line out) is about 70 feet.

    If I am fishing on a large enough river that I need to reach farther than 70 feet I am able to set up my casts with that whole 45 foot head & 14 foot leader out of my tit top. I then allow the vinyl coated shooting line to augment the distance of the casts. If I have the whole head - the leader - and 20 feet or more of shooting line out I can estimate the cast at 90 to 95 feet with the rod length considered.


    That seems far enough for almost every fishable situation I encounter here. It is possible for me to extend beyond that 90 to 95 foot range but that takes effort. It takes effort and energy to cast the 90 - 95 feet but I can do that in a very relaxed and rhythmic way, it's pretty easy. When I go longer than that comfort zone there are a couple things worth mentioning and maybe you have the same sensations. Number one is that it is no longer easy, I have to really focus and use more speed and power. Number two is,the timing and line management (managing the shooting line) need to be perfect. Number three is that I have a higher probability of failure (blowing the whole effort) when I am attempting casting beyond 100 foot in length.

    Am I alone or do you have similar results?

    The exception to this distance thing would be to use my 15 foot Winston with a 70 foot Partridge Long Belly line loaded on it. With this rod you set up the cast with approximately 65 feet of the belly and a 15 foot leader outside the tip top. If you only use the 70 head - leader and rod length you have easy 95 to 100 foot casts. If I have the room then I can get another 20 feet of the running line involved and hit 120 pretty easy. The problem with all this is that I need plenty of room both behind (for huge D loop) and in front (for 120 foot forward cast) so I don't use that rig very often.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  11. #29

    Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    I haven't done a direct comparison of the two lines. I generally don't/can't cast over 80-85 feet, and usually less. It's a subjective thing that I feel or think that the mono line shoots better. If I had to put a number on it, I would say 10% more, or 7 feet for a 70 foot cast, with the mono.
    "At least we don't have any stinky fish we gotta clean."

    Bob Nall

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  13. #30
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    Default Re: Pros and cons of mono and coated running lines

    I'm glad you came back and posted Sometimes threads just die on the vine. I would say that 90% of fish I have contact with come under 70 feet. Not many under 40 so I'd say between 40 & 70 is the hot zone. I also have way more control over my fly at those distances. When I throw one out over 85 foot I'm reduced to standing there holding the cork.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

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