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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Languedoc/near montpellier
    Posts
    6,680
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default Re: Roll cast question

    Glad you got a lot of replies

  2. Default Re: Roll cast question

    Thank you all for the videos, tips, and suggestions!

    Just when you think you're getting the hang of things a whole new wrinkle is thrown into the mix. However, that's what makes this such a wonderful sport....always something to learn.

    Thank you all again, and now it's time digest this information and find what works for me.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Roll cast question

    I have a question about roll casting. is there a limit to how far or how much line you can roll cast? i'm only able to roll cast maybe 20 feet so far, though i've only been fly fishing for 2 days now.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    5,392

    Default Re: Roll cast question

    Hi ssjchar,

    I got a little chuckle out of your 2 Day comment. It is going to take a little longer than that to learn all of the cast.

    If you are only getting 20 feet you are probably throwing the cast downward at the end. You can aim your roll cast upward to gain more distance. It is the same principal as when you make a regular cast. You can tilt the forward delivery higher to gain more distance. If you end any cast with the rod tip going down toward the water you will limit your distance.

    Frank

  5. Default Re: Roll cast question

    It's my opinion that alot of anglers overthink their roll cast. It's fairly intuitive and easy to do. Also, although I think a spey cast can be effective in certain situations, it shouldn't be needed when a roll cast will work almost anywhere. The only difference with still water and moving water is that instead of the 'D' shape being directly behind you, it's more downstream. I find it easiest to use the roll cast when my casting arm is my downstream arm. Just allow your line to go all the way downstream and lose all the slack, then just as in the still water roll cast, bring your rod up and allow the line to form a 'D' shape behind you and cast. Simple! I actually find it easier to roll cast on moving water as you don't have to worry about getting rid of all the slack, the stream will do that for you

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    5,392

    Default Re: Roll cast question

    Hi Everyone,

    If you do a lot of roll casting you have to learn how to cast from both shoulders. You should have a small tilt to your hand to the right with a right hander. If the wind changes you need to tilt your hand to the left so the rod now comes back over the left shoulder but still with the right hand. So let the wind decide how you are going to make your roll cast. If you don't, as the line unrolls the wind will blow the line into its self. Switch to the other shoulder and the wind will blow the line away from your cast.

    Frank

  7. #17

    Default Re: Roll cast question

    Do you advocate the D loop system with rolls and spey casts? only reason I ask is that it helps with the safety aspect for those learning, that the D loop is kept to the side where the wind is blowing ie up or down. and keeps the line away from your body.Spey casts are designed as change of direction casts on running water and more used than just the basic roll,
    As Frank says usefull to be able to cast off both shoulders.

    Spey casts I find are very easily learned when you switch from single hand rods to double handed,but going from double to single for some can be alot harder.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Truckee, CA.
    Posts
    2,159
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Roll cast question

    Another great place to use the roll cast, is "rolling up" a line from the water.
    I often water load a cast directly upstream. Then, as my line returns to me, I raise my rod tip naturally into a roll cast position. As soon as the line forms a loop behind the rod I angle my next roll cast more across the current. In two or three, cast/drift/roll up sequences, I can often cover close to 90 degrees across the stream. This is better to me than false casting, because the line is on the water more. An old guy once told me, "you can't catch fish with your line in the air".
    Ultimately, it's not catching fish that satisfies, but knowing how.

    Bigfly

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    5,392

    Default Re: Roll cast question

    Hi Everyone,

    As Ken mentioned sometimes I like to use a roll cast to pick up the fly line. You start the same motion as the regular roll cast but you aim it higher and the line will pick up off the water and roll over into a straight line in the air. You need to have the fly moving when you begin the cast and you have to aim the cast higher. I used this a lot when fishing a short integrated sink tip. You can't pick up as much line and you have to cast from the correct side to accommodate any wind.

    Frank

  10. Default Re: Roll cast question

    Anyone can give me some advise for picking up big flies out of the water with a RollCast? For Example, there is no way I can acheive a Rollcast when a size 6 wooly bugger is tied to my line. There is just not enough power in my cast to lift it up of the water.

    Thanks
    Breach
    Last edited by breach; 03-22-2010 at 11:36 AM.

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