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Thread: casting weight

  1. #1

    Default casting weight

    Hey guys,
    Swinging a steelhead fly; with 3-4 split shots.... I felt as though I was flinging the fly back and forth violently to get any distance. For casting weight should I use another technique from the traditional cast? I also have the issue on a smaller scale using a bubble indicator. I am I crazy? FYI 9' 6wt rod, 5 weight floating, 9' rio taper.
    thanks!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    White City (tad north of Medford) Oar-E-Gone
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    Default Re: casting weight

    The "3 - 4" number may be the issue here, go to a weighted fly and only one, but wiser minds than mine will chime in on that. As for the bobber/indicator, go to a smaller size or use what (for a lack of a better term) the guys here on the Rogue do which is a 'flop cast.' Looks ugly, but watched guys toss indicators the size of a golf ball with a 7wt road.

    And before I forget, welcome to the NA version of the UK fly fishing forum. Any predictions on what your snow pack may be like this winter?
    When wealth is lost, nothing is lost; when health is lost, something is lost; when character is lost, all is lost. - Billy Graham"

  3. #3

    Default Re: casting weight

    Thanks for that info! No word on the pack yet, i am sure it can’t compare to this years! Our reservoirs are still full! It made for a very late season on our rivers.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: casting weight

    Quote Originally Posted by sopo bj View Post
    Hey guys,
    Swinging a steelhead fly; with 3-4 split shots.... FYI 9' 6wt rod, 5 weight floating, 9' rio taper.

    A 5 weight line on a 6 weight rod is one issue. You don't have enough line mass to put a load in the rod to throw your payload. You may want to use a 6 weight or even a 7 weight line to help make it all come together.

    If you can make the time, drive down to Bob Nakagawa's shop in Modesto (Sierra Anglers). Make sure to show Bob what you have, so he can get your gear set up properly to fish the way you wish to fish.

    I like Fred's response.

    Dennis

  5. #5
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    Default Re: casting weight

    Quote Originally Posted by sopo bj View Post
    Thanks for that info! No word on the pack yet, i am sure it can’t compare to this years! Our reservoirs are still full! It made for a very late season on our rivers.
    2 extra points for Dennis .... I read right over/missed the point that your rod was 'under lined.' Right there you're toast just as he's outlined.

    Can believe the "reservoirs are still fill." Not quite the same here on the upper Rogue, but it did take another two months before they could lower the flows to some thing reasonable for fly fishing. Bet all the lawns in LA are a bright green.
    When wealth is lost, nothing is lost; when health is lost, something is lost; when character is lost, all is lost. - Billy Graham"

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default Re: casting weight

    Depending on the size of the split shot, I think you may just have an uncastable rig on the end of your flyline. With that kind of lead, you might be better off fishing a running line and doing the lob cast.

    I think you'd be better off fishing a 150-200 grain Teeny type line (24' fast sinking line attached to a floating running line) to get your fly down. There's a bit of a learning curve on fishing those lines, but once you get it, its a much safer and more efficient way to swing for steelhead.
    http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-..._1276302_n.jpg

    I'd rather hunt fish than bait deer any day.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: casting weight

    I took a seminar with Bob Clouser a few years ago.
    The subject was casting weight.
    What we practiced was the elliptical or oval cast,sometimes called the Belgian cast.

    Elliptical Fly Casting - fly fishing and fly casting from a pro - Günter Feuerstein international Master flycasting instructor
    The Belgian Cast | MidCurrent
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.” --- Horace Kephart

  8. #8

    Default Re: casting weight

    I agree that the oval cast or constant tension cast is a good one because it avoids a tailing loop and minimizes the possibility of hitting the fly rod with the fly or shot.

    I would also recommend the the water tension cast. Allow the line to go down stream and the friction of the line on the water and the weight in the water to load the rod for the forward cast.
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

  9. #9

    Default Re: casting weight

    What river are you on.. Lower Sacramento? Trinity?

    I'm assuming you're doing indicator fishing, with nymphs (or egg patterns)

    3 or 4 split shots seems like a lot

    For the Trinity or the Sac, I'd think 2 BBs would do most of the river, always did for me, and many places (especially on the Trinity), one is often enough.

    I used a #6 for a long time, but did go to an #8.

    The weight did have my wife move from her Sage SLT to a faster rod, to dump them over easier. I sure don't cast these like I cast a dry or light nymphs.
    Dave
    406

  10. #10

    Default Re: casting weight

    My plan is to go with a sinking tip on a 7 weight set up eventually.I'm hoping that will get me down, remember guys I'm a newb with the fly! Thanks for all the great info!! I defenitly agree I'm running to much weight, I tried fishing all levels of the river, by the time I was hitting bottom I had 4 small split shots on my lead! Talked to a local and that was his suggestion... To answer your question it was the klamath. Also any advise for that river would be great For nyphing I went with a smaller indicator and has better casting results, I think I'm so use to Throwing little dry flies around for trout.. I noticed a few guys doing a one handed spey cast type thing, that seemed to get there heavy lines out a ways. (sorry if my terminology is off a notch) And yes I went into the Modesto fly shop this afternoon, cool dude that was glad to share all kinds of good info also. I appreciate all the info guys, I'm eager to start landing some steelies on my file set up

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