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  1. Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    Quote Originally Posted by swirlchaser View Post
    I've seen these before but never knew if they actually worked.

    Umpqua - Umpqua? Fly Line Scale
    That's exactly the one I've had. And I have measured varoius weights (in grains) on my RCBS powder scale and they have always aligned correctly on the Umpqua.

    It's really handy when you've got more lines than reels and you wonder "what the heck weight is this line"?

  2. #12

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    I know all I need to know about CCS. It was done to death on Sexyloops. We even created a rod data base Sexyloops Rod Database

    Despite Dr Bills best efforts I never got my head round it.

    The line checker looks good, I need one. Can anyone give me a link to an online dealer?

    Mike

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    south florida
    Posts
    2,150

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    Tp,

    Thanks for the link and info. I will buy one myself. I didn't know there was such a thing. I was looking at balance beams on ebay just a week or so ago, but since you've checked that one for accuracy and found it good, I will go with it. Much handier.
    http://www.miterclamp.com/Images/N_Amer_FF.jpg Cheers, Jim

  4. Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    Right, wrong, or indifferent, since I was test casting this new 10wt and comparing it to my 9wt, I wound up measuring the first 30' of line on two differnt lines and took a Sharpie and marked a spot about a half inch all the way around the line.

    After verifying the line's weight, I'd use that mark to let out just enough line past the tip top so I would cast only 30' - might be a bit overkill but I've always been a bit anal-retentive.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Parlin, NJ / Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    2,063

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    Quote Originally Posted by tpcollins View Post
    Right, wrong, or indifferent, since I was test casting this new 10wt and comparing it to my 9wt, I wound up measuring the first 30' of line on two differnt lines and took a Sharpie and marked a spot about a half inch all the way around the line.

    After verifying the line's weight, I'd use that mark to let out just enough line past the tip top so I would cast only 30' - might be a bit overkill but I've always been a bit anal-retentive.
    Be careful when lines in the 9-11wt range, especially saltwater lines. They routinely have heads longer than 30'. If your trying to cast a line with a 45' head and only using the first 30' you won't get favorable results.
    The best way to a fisherman's heart is through his fly.

  6. #16

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    Since many here are gear and casting freaks I find it suprising many don't have the Umpqua scale.
    It can be tweaked and calibrated bit using a known weight which is great since most all doubt about its accuracy can be removed. To further eliminate doubt you can always do a comparitive measurement at the weight the line is supposed to be.
    I keep a small slip of paper in the alligator jaw to place 30' of line in large loops in the paper. the tag end of the line adds weight so always make sure to minimize it's influence somehow. I usually just hold it next to the loops so as not to add weight.
    The Umpqua scale is a handy contraption that is always in my reel case. I use it quite a bit for friends and fellow club members who aren't sure of their line weights.
    The 30' standard may not be perfect for all lines and situations but for the everyday fly fisher who just wants an idea of what their true line weight is it's a pretty handy device.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    south florida
    Posts
    2,150

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    Jackster,

    I had always figured guys were using triple beam scales for weighing lines. Since that thing is cheap and so handy, I will have one soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Swirl
    Be careful when lines in the 9-11wt range, especially saltwater lines. They routinely have heads longer than 30'. If your trying to cast a line with a 45' head and only using the first 30' you won't get favorable results.
    Agreed. I would be more apt to mark the end of the head if I were going to mark it, as well as weighing the entire head and not the first 30 feet. Once you find one line that works well with the rod and then weigh the entire head, then you can email the the manufacturers for a total head weight that is closest to the optimum for that particular rod.




    Cheers,
    Jim
    Last edited by wjc; 11-08-2011 at 05:07 PM. Reason: BLUE
    http://www.miterclamp.com/Images/N_Amer_FF.jpg Cheers, Jim

  8. #18

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    To measure line weight, just coil up the first 30 feet and put it on any grain scale. I have a digital that works fine. Then go to the AFTM chart to see where the line lies.
    If the line is a sink tip you can start cutting off the tip until it matches the weight line you need.
    Many sink tips are sold with only the weight of the sink tip provided. No mention is made of the AFTM weight. How the hell can a 650gr, 20ft sink tip be rated for a 10 weight rod?
    To get proper line/rod balance don't forget to add the split shot and weighted fly to the line weight.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,760

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    I don't like the idea behind the CCS. It's a measurement of a tool at rest, and that tool isn't used in a static manner. My 5wt Z-Axis is reported to be a 7.5wt on some CCS charts, but it works just fine with a 5wt GPX line for the nearly 4 years I've owned the rod. I've even used a 4wt GPX line with the rod. I've thought about trying a 6wt line on the rod only because it was suggested by a guy that uses the same rod a lot, but it casts fine with the 5wt and I'm lazy. If the rod is working well with the line weight designated on the rod, then enjoy.

    CCS: Sounds okay until you start adding the variables, i.e, the caster, distance, weight of fly, leader, etc. My wife and I can use the same rod, but we don't use the same amount of force when moving the rod. At times, I'll use more force than my wife, and at other times (usually the wrong time), she'll apply much more power than needed. When she's using the Z-Axis, she knows she used the right amount of force when the line is snapped out of her left hand. That's often less force, and proper timing, and she always gives that smile that says, "I got it right".

    There are probably rods out there that would work better with a line other than the one designated, but I've never owned one. There are some tournament rods that reportedly don't load well unless you have a LOT of line in the air, but I only buy rods meant for fishing. I suppose if you had a 5wt tournament rod, and wanted to use it on a small stream, then a heavier line might work better.

    P.S. I own graphite and bamboo 4wt rods. I've never done it, but could guarantee you that a bag of pennies hung from the graphite rods would touch the floor on the bamboo rods. The bamboo flexes from here to tomorrow, but casts a 4wt line with beautiful loops.

  10. #20

    Default Re: How do you know you have the right line for your rod?

    It also depends a lot on the distance of your cast. A short cast may take overweighting by 1 or 2 line sizes to make casting easy. Long cast, such as for cruisers out of a tube, you may want to underweight one size.
    I can generally cast a size up or down, but it takes a few casts to get used to the change in rhythm.
    Testing your rod and line just gives you a baseline to work from in my opinion and this is just something I do because there is too much ice to fish the streams and not enough to ice fish the lakes yet!

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