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  1. Default casting sinking lines

    hi,
    I think I'm okay at casting my wf dry line on my 6wt rod. I don't know if my technique is totally correct, but I can get some decent aim and distance. It could be better I suppose. But when it comes to casting my sinking line things don't work so well. I'm not sure I even need to cast it very well when lake fishing, so I guess that would be my first question! Generally speaking the line feels very heavy and quite often it can get tangled if I do more than 1 false cast. The 2nd problem is that my stripped line sinks relatively fast at my feet (or waist) so that I can't really shoot the line. Maybe I just don't have enough line speed to pull it from the water, or maybe I need to do more false casts.

    Are these common problems, and are there any general tips or suggestions?

    thanks

  2. #2

    Default Re: casting sinking lines

    Get a stripping basket or net to hold your loose line. Then just peactice making casts with the sinking line. Think Smoother, not Stronger. Timing is everything.
    Jakeway Near Nashville, TN

    Kayaks: Just part of the drag system

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    5,392

    Default Re: casting sinking lines

    Hi shmish,

    The sinking line can be a problem and takes some getting use to. Don't expect to cast it as well as a floating line. It is important that you get the line up to the surface before you start your back cast. It is important that the rod tip is close to the water before starting the rod tip moving on the back cast. One way to get everything moving is to coil line in your line hand as you strip it in so it doesn't sink into the water. When the fly is near the surface you can make a roll cast pickup. You do it like a roll cast but you aim the forward cast above the water and as it straightens out you start you back cast. You can feed line from your line hand and shoot what is left. This is not a long range cast. When holding the large coils in your line hand I lightly put my thumb over the coils so when you shoot the line it won't pile up at your first guide. It just takes practice. The above thoughts are using a sink tip line but will work with a full sinking line. Joni does a lot of this kind of fishing and may have some ideas for you.

    It sounds to me that you would be better off with a sink tip line for this fishing. With a sink tip the line you strip onto the water is a floating line and you won't have the problem of it sinking. If you are fishing deep enough that a full sinking line is needed a striping basket is a good solution as Jakeway suggested. A stripping basket does not work well for deep wading.

  4. Default Re: casting sinking lines

    Thanks Frank. I do hear this all the time about sinking line being harder to cast. I don't know how much help I will be cause I don't see it. I even use GLASS rods and have a TYPE VII. I actually think they cast easy. You HAVE TO SLOW DOWN and as Frank said get it to the surface. You can have a lot more floating line on the water to recast, but I have had fish hit my sinking line 5' to 10' in front of me, so it is good to strip it ALL the way in.
    I on the other hand, I have a STREAMER line which is the 15' of sink on a dry. That thing is tuff to cast. All that weight in 15 feet. feels like trying to cast 50 split shot (BB size) all in one spot of a fly line.
    In answer to you other question, NO, I don't think presentation with a sinking line is that big of issue. If you are in a tube and you can fling it out there, try kicking backwards and pull some more line out. When you get as much line out as you want, then start stripping it in.
    It will curl just like dry line, but one fish on with 60 to 70' of line out, it straightens out real quick ;-)

  5. Default Re: casting sinking lines

    thanks for the info.
    It sounds like I probably just need to get better at casting in general. If I have nice loops in the air the sinking line casts okay. Definitely the timing is different because the line is a lot heavier, and I haven't had much luck shooting line because of the sinking thing I mentioned. The stripping basket sounds interesting.

    For interest, I would say that casting a sinking line is easier than casting my floating line with sink tips, especially when I have a decent sized streamer on the end of the sink tip. That puts a lot of weight at the end and gets kind of crazy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    5,392

    Default Re: casting sinking lines

    Hi shmish,

    Just to clarify, the sink tip line I am talking about is the ones built to be a sink tip line by the manufacture. You can not add or remove the sink tip. I am not talking about adding a sinking tip to a floating line.

    Here is SA's description:

    Wet Tip II - WF6F/S
    This is the best all around sinking tip fly line made, and absolutely indispensible for trout fishing! The Wet Tip has a uniquely tapered front section and a graduated density transition from the floating section to the sinking tip that has little "hinge" and turns over easily. Each line weight has progressively longer sinking tip lengths appropriately designed for that individual line weight to insure direct contact, improve sensitivity, and turn flies over easily. 3 weight lines have a 6.5 foot tip, a 6 weight line has a 10 foot sinking tip section, and a 9 weight has a sink tip nearly 15 feet long. Color: Mist Green/Green Tip.

  7. Default Re: casting sinking lines

    Frank....WOW! very interesting. You being a Guide in Alaska will know more about sink tips then just about anyone else I know.
    I know there is advantage to sink tips, such as having the line float for mending and drift.
    I just haven't fished water that I couldn't use a full sink, but I know they are there.
    I do know from talking to DEC that if the water is fast and shallow to not be afraid to use a short leader. That the Salmon or Steelhead really aren't that leader shy.

  8. Default Re: casting sinking lines

    I find sinking-tiip lines easier to cast than floating lines. Sinking tips cut through the wind.

    Your sinking line might be tangling so much because it's a mono-core line. I buy only low-memory lines. Before I fish, however, I pull most of the line off the reel then gently pull out the coils. After I finish fishing I cut off my fly, make the longest cast I can, then reel the line in. This takes out some of the line twist.

    As for stripping baskets, I've tried many. My favorite by far is the Orvis. It has nine cones which helps reduce tangling. True it costs about $60.00, but in my opinion it's worth it.

    Randy Kadish

  9. Default Re: casting sinking lines

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Whiton View Post
    Hi shmish,

    Just to clarify, the sink tip line I am talking about is the ones built to be a sink tip line by the manufacture. You can not add or remove the sink tip. I am not talking about adding a sinking tip to a floating line.

    Here is SA's description:

    Wet Tip II - WF6F/S
    This is the best all around sinking tip fly line made, and absolutely indispensible for trout fishing! The Wet Tip has a uniquely tapered front section and a graduated density transition from the floating section to the sinking tip that has little "hinge" and turns over easily. Each line weight has progressively longer sinking tip lengths appropriately designed for that individual line weight to insure direct contact, improve sensitivity, and turn flies over easily. 3 weight lines have a 6.5 foot tip, a 6 weight line has a 10 foot sinking tip section, and a 9 weight has a sink tip nearly 15 feet long. Color: Mist Green/Green Tip.
    Are sink tip lines usually used on streams/rivers for nymphing or using streamers? Typically at what point do people stop using weights on the leader/tippet and move to a sink type line?

    I recently learned what a "nymph" line is, maybe someone could correct me if I'm wrong. A nymph line is a floating line that is bigger (diameter? stiffness? weight?) at the tip, which makes the line nicer for turning over heavier nymph and streamer flies when compared to the standard WF line.

    cheers
    Doug

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Grand canyon of Pa.
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: casting sinking lines

    i use weight along with a sinking or sinktip to drive the fly down on big water... I agree on the orvis basket, ive tried em all and even made a few...cant be beat
    sandfly/ bob
    (www.bigmeadowsflyshop.com)
    N.J.B.B.A. #2215

    I did not escape.....they gave me a day pass!
    from the outer edge of nowhere
    fly tying and fishing Gillie..

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