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Thread: observation on casting style

  1. Default observation on casting style

    Over the past 6 months I've tried to improve my single overhead casting with my 9' 8wt and SA Mastery Stillwater line. I've always struggled with this setup and today's session was no different. The line is supposedly an advanced line in that the head is something like 40' so that a person needs to be able to fly a reasonable amount of line before shooting it. My rod is a medium-fast action Dragonfly Expedition which matches what SA specs for the line (med-fast). I've found the rod to be noodley and only periodically do I cast the line well.

    Today I grabbed my TFO 9' 6wt rod and slapped on the Stillwater line. Within 2 casts I was shooting line no problemo. I think this rod is also considered to be med-fast action but it feels a lot snappier. Even though the 6wt is a lighter rod I think the 8wt was flexing more. Watching the tip of the rods, the 8wt tip would flop around.

    Taking a guess here: it seems to me that my casting style is faster/snappier. If I had a slower, smoother cast then the 8wt Dragonfly would work better.

    I was actually prepping today and then was going to book a lesson specifically to work on casting this line. But after trying the line on the 6wt I'm inclined to hold off. For sure I could use a lesson to show me how to adapt my stroke since I'm sure a better caster could use this line with the 8wt Dragonfly rod. I think I'll save the $$ and lesson for my new spey setup though.

    Anyways, I'm wondering if other people have had similar experiences with casting styles, different rods, overlining rods, etc.

    cheers
    Doug

  2. #2

    Default Re: observation on casting style

    Hi there Doug

    there are a lot of variables here and the only constants are your style and the line--

    -the dragonfly is supposedly an 8 wt?---you have to back off to cast it well?

    overlining the temple fork 2 line weights brings the tempo up and the extra weight lets you shoot better?

    with all the above assumed to be true---it sounds like the dragonfly rod might be a little soft and might do better with a 7 wt line---can you borrow a 7 wt line and try it on both rods?

    Id advise any caster to take a lesson or 2 from a qualified instructor it can only enhance your time on the water.

    mike
    "something is happening here but i dont know what it is"---dylan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Default Re: observation on casting style

    Sorry to badmouth your gear, but from your description, that Dragonfly stick is a sorry buggywhip of a rod that has no dampening whatsoever. I don't recommend using that 8wt line on your TFO 6wt regularly, but it sounds like it works pretty well when used as a shooting head. Dan Blanton Fly Casting Lessons

    When fishing that line, since its an intermediate, make sure you're using a roll cast to put the line on the surface before you begin your backcast. Failing to do this will prevent any rod from working like its supposed to.
    http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-..._1276302_n.jpg

    I'd rather hunt fish than bait deer any day.

  4. Default Re: observation on casting style

    Yeah, for sure I need to roll cast to pick up the line.

    Out of curiousity, what are some issues with using the line regularly on the 6wt?

    I also now remember several years ago when I was fishing with my girlfriend (now my wife). We both had 9' 6wt rods, I had my TFO and she had a dragonfly. I couldn't cast her rod worth a darn, even with the same WF line. It was a noodle. I bought her a TFO for her birthday.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    4,313

    Default Re: observation on casting style

    I should clarify that I meant "regularly" in two different ways.

    First: rods are designed to be cast with the line marked on them, and casting a heavier one can overload the rod to the point of damaging it. Overloading by one line weight is commonly done (though not wise IMO), but overlining it by 2 puts lots of stress on the rod that could lead to it snapping. Unless....

    Second: If you treat the rig (8wt line, 6wt rod) as a shooting head set up, and are careful about how much line you have outside the rod tip before you shoot, you may not have rod stress problems. (but this isn't what I would call casting "regularly") If you want to do this, I would pull out a sharpie and make a 6" section of line all black somewhere around the 25'-30' point. To cast, strip the line up to where this black section of line is at the rod tip, put the line on the surface, make one backcast, and shoot on the forward cast.

    While this sharpie work will make your nice clear line more visible, that section will always be at least 30' away from your fly.
    http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-..._1276302_n.jpg

    I'd rather hunt fish than bait deer any day.

  6. Default Re: observation on casting style

    I sort of do that right now. I have a mark at 48', so when I have the mark in my hand I know that 40' of line is outside the rod. So what I've been trying to do is strip to the mark then strip in maybe another 8-10'. I then roll cast, two false casts, then shoot. Maybe that's too much for the rod though. I don't know how much i'll use this setup in the end. I have a spey rod and I may line it with scandi head or similar for beach casting (which is what I use the Stillwater for).

    One thing I'll say is that a black mark on a clear line is darn hard to see. It's almost easier to find the 40' by feeling the line diameter.

    cheers

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