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Thread: Improving my cast

  1. #11

    Default Re: Improving my cast

    For the quickest improvements in your casting I would suggest getting lessons from a good casting instructor and following those up with practice. Books and video's can't see your casts but will make you a more well-rounded caster and may present points that you might not have considered.
    I don't believe practicing casting without water hurts at all. You can do almost every cast on land that you can do on water. With weights or grass leaders you can even get a decent roll cast on dry ground.
    The beauty of lessons is that you get instant feedback on your casts. This is the stuff you hopefully remember when reinforcing the lessons with practice.
    Casting is casting, be it on the water or not on the water. When practicing at the park I start off with close, accuracy work, then tricky shots like curves, aerial mends and single-handed spey techniques and such and then distance mixed in with more accuracy. Every single one of these helps when I get on the water to fish. Part of what I really enjoy in fly fishing lately is going for the hard to reach fish.
    I always have a rod in the car and manage to get out just casting 4-5 times a week if I'm not fishing. I'm not letting the lack of nearby water to cast on stop me from improving my game. Fly casting is an integral part of fly fishing and all else being equal the better caster will catch more fish for obvious reasons.
    Just as some say they know people who cast well but can't catch fish I know many more people who can't cast well and their catch rate reflects that.

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Park City, UT
    Posts
    315

    Default Re: Improving my cast

    I got one of those Echo Micro Practice Rods for Christmas and it's a ball in the house during these winter months. I agree on-water practice is the best but most of us don't get out enough I'm pretty sure my living room, lawn, and park casting has helped my overall casting. Even if it hasn't, it sure as heck feels therapeutic!

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Park City, UT
    Posts
    315

    Default Re: Improving my cast

    I took a casting lesson last week for help with a tailing loop problem. Not a big shocker, too much wrist and too much force.

    I was also taught a fade cast wherein after stopping the rod on the back cast, you allow the rod tip to travel back some more as the line straightens. When I got it right, it did solve my tailing loops. I had never heard of a fade before.

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  6. #14

    Default Re: Improving my cast

    Quote Originally Posted by cletus View Post
    I took a casting lesson last week for help with a tailing loop problem. Not a big shocker, too much wrist and too much force.

    I was also taught a fade cast wherein after stopping the rod on the back cast, you allow the rod tip to travel back some more as the line straightens. When I got it right, it did solve my tailing loops. I had never heard of a fade before.
    Now that you know the move, you might as well get the terminology right. The proper term is "drift". A rod drift repositions the rod in the direction of the previous cast as the line is unfurling. This repositioning of the fly rod increases the distance available for the next casting stroke. So if you drift the rod backward after the backcast stop, you will begin the forward stroke form further back, giving you a longer stroke for the next forward cast.

    Fly rod Drifting

    Why did this cure the tailing loop? I think your tailing loop was caused by a sudden jab or sudden acceleration when you try to add extra distance to your forward cast. By drifting, a longer stroke path allowed for a longer cast without the jab.

    If you do not get tailing loops while false casting, I think you might be creeping the fly rod on your forward delivery cast. "Creep" is the opposite of "drift". Creep is the forward repositioning of the fly rod in the direction of the next cast, before the actual power stroke begins. Basically the caster anticipates the start of the next a cast. and begins moving the rod before the actual cast. This "creep" or early rod movement shortens the rod stroke and the caster tries to get more power into too short a stroke path. The caster "jabs" or shocks the rod in an attempt to increase line speed. This sudden application of power bends the rod ===> shortens the rod ===> dips the rod tip ===> concave rod tip path ===> tailing loop.

    Creep and Jab | Cure this common casting blunder to get rid of tailing loops

    It may be that the rod drift is canceling rod creep. So be mindful of rod creep when you try for extra distance.
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

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  8. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Park City, UT
    Posts
    315

    Default Re: Improving my cast

    Thanks Silver. Right now, the drift often feels like a hinge to me, but that's obviously operator error. Next time I go to the park, I'm going to video it so I can see everything I'm doing wrong!

  9. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    south florida
    Posts
    2,150

    Default Re: Improving my cast

    Quote Originally Posted by Cletus
    Next time I go to the park, I'm going to video it so I can see everything I'm doing wrong!
    That's a good idea. And if you post a link to it it up here you might get some more specific advice, and we might get an idea what you mean by this:

    the drift often feels like a hinge to me
    http://www.miterclamp.com/Images/N_Amer_FF.jpg Cheers, Jim

  10. #17

    Default Re: Improving my cast

    Just the newbie here, but to the OP, are you just wanting to improve in general with what you have as far as equipment? I don't (and won't) spend huge $$$$ for what I love to do, but to me it makes a difference on what rod/line I use for different water, as in still, creeks, rivers. float tubing etc. Luckily I can do it all within two hours of home.

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