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Thread: Knowing when a line is too light?

  1. #11

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    My pleasure!! Hope it helps!
    Less likey, more green dots
    BrookFieldAngler.com

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    159

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    Quote Originally Posted by floorabove View Post
    I need to try a few different lines, I thought I had slowed it down, but maybe I need to really slow my cast down


    Thanks for the help
    It always helps me to watch the back cast. I actually aim the back cast about 45 degrees up and back. By watching the loop, I can get into sync with the rod/line/leader/fly/wind.... My most common problem is not letting the back cast develop.

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  4. #13
    turbineblade Guest

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    Just a tip:

    As your casting improves it is amazing how "great" your fly rod becomes. I'd dead serious about this. I swapped lines, rods, etc. for a while when I first got into fly fishing and eventually I reached a level of competence that now, I'm confident picking up just about any rod and any line (within reason) and casting fine with it. You'll be there too -- just keep your current stuff and practice.

    What I mean is that good casting mechanics trumps rod/line configuration.

    That said, you might have minor preferences for rod actions and + or - 1 weight of fly line or something. That's normal.

    Just keep at it! That's what I do.

  5. #14

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    Quote Originally Posted by roadkill1948 View Post
    It always helps me to watch the back cast. I actually aim the back cast about 45 degrees up and back. By watching the loop, I can get into sync with the rod/line/leader/fly/wind.... My most common problem is not letting the back cast develop.
    I know I am not a great efficient caster but with other combos I own i can form loops SOME of the time, even nice loops SOME of the time, I just couldn't get this combo to work. I think I need to really really slow it down.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    211

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    Quote Originally Posted by floorabove View Post
    I know I am not a great efficient caster but with other combos I own i can form loops SOME of the time, even nice loops SOME of the time, I just couldn't get this combo to work. I think I need to really really slow it down.
    I recommend you borrow/buy a 'soft' rod - an old glass rod or even cane would do nicely - and just get a feel for 'working' with a fly line. I recently put a softer actioned rod in the hands of actually quite a good caster and the surprise and joy was a delight to see. (It was a new Hardy 'Glass' 7ft #3 - with #3 line)

    Most people have forgotten (or dont realize) that bendy rods make fly casting easy and a pleasure!

    Cheers

    Colin.

    PS. I make the assumption here that your light line is not working the rod because the rod is stiff - and thus you need to do more with your wrist/flick and left hand hauling (more advanced techniques). Softer rods do the work for you!

    PPS. Take a softish fly rod with fly line to practise on grass. Cast horizontally with a fixed length of line (say x3 of rod) and simply false cast (back and forth) keeping the rod and cast parallel to the ground at waist height. False cast without hitting the ground until you can do it with your eyes shut. Once mastered and natural you now have the feel of a fly rod!
    Last edited by cb; 09-21-2013 at 05:04 AM. Reason: sp.

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  8. #16

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    Quote Originally Posted by cb View Post
    I recommend you borrow/buy a 'soft' rod - an old glass rod or even cane would do nicely - and just get a feel for 'working' with a fly line. I recently put a softer actioned rod in the hands of actually quite a good caster and the surprise and joy was a delight to see. (It was a new Hardy 'Glass' 7ft #3 - with #3 line)

    Most people have forgotten that bendy rods make fly casting easy and a pleasure!

    Cheers

    Colin.

    PS. I make the assumption here that your light line is not working the rod because the rod is stiff - and thus you need to do more with your wrist/flick and left hand hauling (more advanced techniques). Softer rods do the work for you!

    PPS. Take a softish fly rod with fly line to practise on grass. Cast horizontally with a fixed length of line (say x3 of rod) and simply false cast (back and forth) keeping the rod and cast parallel to the ground at waist height. False cast without hitting the ground until you can do it with your eyes shut. Once mastered and natural you now have the feel of a fly rod!
    great advice, thanks

  9. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    211

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    I forgot to say - keep your elbow fixed into your belly/hip when doing the drill above. An out of control elbow is never good in fly or spey casting.

  10. #18
    turbineblade Guest

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    Quote Originally Posted by cb View Post
    I forgot to say - keep your elbow fixed into your belly/hip when doing the drill above. An out of control elbow is never good in fly or spey casting.
    Left advocates the "elbow on the shelf" style all the time. That said, style really isn't important in fly casting -- the end result is what matters.

    If slightly raising the elbow is more comfortable to the caster -- go for it. The guy from Sexy loops raises his elbow quite a lot when casting and his casting is excellent.

    I just wanted to make sure no one is casting in an uncomfortable manner just to adhere to someone's "style".

  11. #19

    Default Re: Knowing when a line is too light?

    Quote Originally Posted by turbineblade View Post
    Left advocates the "elbow on the shelf" style all the time. That said, style really isn't important in fly casting -- the end result is what matters.

    If slightly raising the elbow is more comfortable to the caster -- go for it. The guy from Sexy loops raises his elbow quite a lot when casting and his casting is excellent.

    I just wanted to make sure no one is casting in an uncomfortable manner just to adhere to someone's "style".
    tb... I think the cb meant to keep the elbow in when doing his horizontal drill. Flailing away with a loose elbow when casting in front of you invites all sorts of ugly into your stroke.That drill is a good one to get your loops in shape. It allows you to see both loops without getting carpal neck syndrome.
    If you slow the stroke way down or cast extra line you can actually see the loop at rest laying on the grass.

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