Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  8
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Fly Line

  1. Default Fly Line

    Does the type of line really make a big difference when casting? I have this full sinking line that casts like a dream, barely have to even try to get it out there and then there is this floating line i have that is like a full time job to cast it out. what would cause that?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Fly Line

    Quote Originally Posted by saucebox11 View Post
    Does the type of line really make a big difference when casting? I have this full sinking line that casts like a dream, barely have to even try to get it out there and then there is this floating line i have that is like a full time job to cast it out. what would cause that?

    I'm not an expert by any means, still learning like most, but I'll answer your question with a few questions. Are the lines of same quality? Is there any visible damage to the floating line? Is the floating line the correct weight?


    Ryan
    Jack of all trades, Master of none.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    On a trout stream/Suburban Pittsburgh
    Posts
    3,358
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Fly Line

    It sure can make a difference as you have pointed out. Case in point your full sinking line vs. the floating line you have. Assuming your floating line is matched appropriately to the rod, could it be that you're more used to casting that rod with the full sinking line than you are casting it with a WF floating line.

    Even within floating lines the same rod can respond differently to various brands of lines based on taper, grains, etc. Also coming into play may be that the WF line you have may not necessarily be the best match for that rod. Hard to tell, there's not a whole lot of info to go on.
    ~*~Leave only your footprints~*~

  4. #4

    Default Re: Fly Line

    Sinking lines are easier to cast than floating line. The reason is that they are thinner and denser and so the "cut" through the air easier. Because of the lower air friction, they maintain their forward momentum and they are less affected by crosswinds and facing winds.

    I sometimes use sinking lines if a casting newbie has a hard time "loading" the rod. Gary Borger gave me a bunch of fly reels that he used to teach fly casting at the Fenwick Fly Fishing Schools. About half were loaded with sinking fly lines.

    However if you are actually fishing the lines rather than grass casting, sinking lines are more difficult. They cannot be directly aerialized into the backast until you retrieve much of the line.
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

  5. Likes kglissmeyer1, Mnflyfish, siege, oarfish, mojo liked this post
  6. Default Re: Fly Line

    the floating line is a CABELAS PRESTIGE WF6F FLYLINE which is the line I usually use. The full sink line is a Cortland 333+ WF Sinking Fly Line. They are both new this year. Ive only used the full sink line a couple of times, but this morning I really noticed the difference when I was casting. The corland was twice the price as the cabelas, is that line twice the quality?

    ---------- Post added at 07:24 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:37 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
    Sinking lines are easier to cast than floating line. The reason is that they are thinner and denser and so the "cut" through the air easier. Because of the lower air friction, they maintain their forward momentum and they are less affected by crosswinds and facing winds.

    I sometimes use sinking lines if a casting newbie has a hard time "loading" the rod. Gary Borger gave me a bunch of fly reels that he used to teach fly casting at the Fenwick Fly Fishing Schools. About half were loaded with sinking fly lines.

    However if you are actually fishing the lines rather than grass casting, sinking lines are more difficult. They cannot be directly aerialized into the backast until you retrieve much of the line.
    What you wrote here about the thinner denser material makes a lot of sense, you are also right about it being more difficult. I havent used this much because at first I was having a hard time getting it off the water and into the air, especially if i stopped false casting.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sparks, NV, USA
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Fly Line

    I'll be waiting to hear what the experts say to your question.

    I just found a WF floating line that's supposed to be the right weight for my rods. I bought it and forgot it, but apparently the fly reel I was using most for practice has a level taper line on it.

    Wondering if a WF floating line will be easier or harder to cast than a LT? Sure hope it will be easier, 'cause I've been getting nowhere for years with this casting biz.
    If you know who Curtis Loew was, we could probably be friends

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Lakeville, Conn.
    Posts
    362

    Default Re: Fly Line

    Are you sure you wound the correct end of the floating line on the reel? If it's on backwards that would explain a lot.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    MD Suburbs of DC
    Posts
    2,553

    Default Re: Fly Line

    Quote Originally Posted by patrick62 View Post
    Are you sure you wound the correct end of the floating line on the reel? If it's on backwards that would explain a lot.
    Good question!! You should check.

    Some other questions you should answer are;
    1. What brand, model, length and weight fly rod are you using?
    2. What brands, models and weights fly lines are you using? (Forgive all the "s", just wanted to emphasize the point.)

    Having this information will help us help you.

    Todd
    Todd

    Good things come to those who wade...

    And YES... the answer is always, "It depends".

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sparks, NV, USA
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Fly Line

    Presuming you were talking to me instead of Saucebox, the rod is a 9' Eagle Claw model, same brand single action reel with no drag, and the backing/line were prespooled and supposedly matched.

    I have two of those rods and two of those reels, plus a Scientific Anglers brand (no model # to be found on any of my reels that I could see) reel that I loaded with Cabela's house brand WF7F in the hopes it might load the rod better. No luck so far.

    Guessing either user error or bad equipment??
    If you know who Curtis Loew was, we could probably be friends

  11. #10

    Default Re: Fly Line

    the weight of the line itself makes a big diffrence in the casting also. a sinking line like stated earlier is heavier than the floating lines. so on the cast it carries the momentum with much less effort than a floating line. the same works for over lining a rod. a 6 wt line will shoot better than a 5 wt line on the same rod since the 6 wt is heavier even in floating lines


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. Likes winstonwt liked this post
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-24-2013, 02:50 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-10-2013, 12:11 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-06-2013, 07:40 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-16-2013, 02:00 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-08-2011, 04:31 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •